Advanced

Daily intake of phthalates, MEHP, and DINCH by ingestion and inhalation

Weiss, Jana M; Gustafsson, Åsa; Gerde, Per; Bergman, Åke; Lindh, Christian H LU and Krais, Annette M LU (2018) In Chemosphere 208. p.40-49
Abstract

Phthalate esters, suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals, are used in a wide range of applications. Because phthalate esters are not covalently bound, they can easily leach into the indoor environment and associate to dust particles. Thus, exposure may occur through inhalation, ingestion, or contact with the skin. However, it is unclear to what degree indoor dust contributes to the daily intake of phthalate esters. This study investigates household dust as an exposure pathway for seven phthalate esters, the monoester MEHP, and the plasticizer DINCH. Household dust collected from children's sleeping rooms and from living rooms were analysed using gas and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To compare two exposure pathways,... (More)

Phthalate esters, suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals, are used in a wide range of applications. Because phthalate esters are not covalently bound, they can easily leach into the indoor environment and associate to dust particles. Thus, exposure may occur through inhalation, ingestion, or contact with the skin. However, it is unclear to what degree indoor dust contributes to the daily intake of phthalate esters. This study investigates household dust as an exposure pathway for seven phthalate esters, the monoester MEHP, and the plasticizer DINCH. Household dust collected from children's sleeping rooms and from living rooms were analysed using gas and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To compare two exposure pathways, different dust particle sizes were generated: a respirable fraction (<5 μm) and an ingested particle fraction in the anticipated size range of skin adherence (<75 μm). Modelling of dust inhalation and ingestion showed that the daily intake of dust-bound phthalate esters was likely to be 2 times (inhalation) to 12 times (ingestion) higher for 21-month-old children than for adults. These children's daily uptake of phthalate esters was 40-140 times higher through ingestion than inhalation. Furthermore, dust may be an exposure pathway for phthalate esters as well as for MEHP. Therefore, phthalate monoesters could be environmental contaminants of their own and need to be considered in health risk assessments.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Chemosphere
volume
208
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85049357740
ISSN
1879-1298
DOI
10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.05.094
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0b05b80-2d58-40b1-b71a-61d8aa6e7252
date added to LUP
2018-06-14 18:21:59
date last changed
2018-07-15 04:49:56
@article{f0b05b80-2d58-40b1-b71a-61d8aa6e7252,
  abstract     = {<p>Phthalate esters, suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals, are used in a wide range of applications. Because phthalate esters are not covalently bound, they can easily leach into the indoor environment and associate to dust particles. Thus, exposure may occur through inhalation, ingestion, or contact with the skin. However, it is unclear to what degree indoor dust contributes to the daily intake of phthalate esters. This study investigates household dust as an exposure pathway for seven phthalate esters, the monoester MEHP, and the plasticizer DINCH. Household dust collected from children's sleeping rooms and from living rooms were analysed using gas and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To compare two exposure pathways, different dust particle sizes were generated: a respirable fraction (&lt;5 μm) and an ingested particle fraction in the anticipated size range of skin adherence (&lt;75 μm). Modelling of dust inhalation and ingestion showed that the daily intake of dust-bound phthalate esters was likely to be 2 times (inhalation) to 12 times (ingestion) higher for 21-month-old children than for adults. These children's daily uptake of phthalate esters was 40-140 times higher through ingestion than inhalation. Furthermore, dust may be an exposure pathway for phthalate esters as well as for MEHP. Therefore, phthalate monoesters could be environmental contaminants of their own and need to be considered in health risk assessments.</p>},
  author       = {Weiss, Jana M and Gustafsson, Åsa and Gerde, Per and Bergman, Åke and Lindh, Christian H and Krais, Annette M},
  issn         = {1879-1298},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {40--49},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemosphere},
  title        = {Daily intake of phthalates, MEHP, and DINCH by ingestion and inhalation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.05.094},
  volume       = {208},
  year         = {2018},
}