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Association of gluten intake during the first 5 years of life with incidence of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease among children at increased risk

Andrén Aronsson, Carin LU ; Lee, Hye Seung ; Hård Af Segerstad, Elin M. LU ; Uusitalo, Ulla ; Yang, Jimin ; Koletzko, Sibylle ; Liu, Edwin ; Kurppa, Kalle ; Bingley, Polly J. and Toppari, Jorma , et al. (2019) In JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association 322(6). p.514-523
Abstract

Importance: High gluten intake during childhood may confer risk of celiac disease. Objectives: To investigate if the amount of gluten intake is associated with celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease in genetically at-risk children. Design, Setting, and Participants: The participants in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY), a prospective observational birth cohort study designed to identify environmental triggers of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, were followed up at 6 clinical centers in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Between 2004 and 2010, 8676 newborns carrying HLA antigen genotypes associated with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease were enrolled. Screening for celiac disease... (More)

Importance: High gluten intake during childhood may confer risk of celiac disease. Objectives: To investigate if the amount of gluten intake is associated with celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease in genetically at-risk children. Design, Setting, and Participants: The participants in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY), a prospective observational birth cohort study designed to identify environmental triggers of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, were followed up at 6 clinical centers in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Between 2004 and 2010, 8676 newborns carrying HLA antigen genotypes associated with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease were enrolled. Screening for celiac disease with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies was performed annually in 6757 children from the age of 2 years. Data on gluten intake were available in 6605 children (98%) by September 30, 2017. Exposures: Gluten intake was estimated from 3-day food records collected at ages 6, 9, and 12 months and biannually thereafter until the age of 5 years. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was celiac disease autoimmunity, defined as positive tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies found in 2 consecutive serum samples. The secondary outcome was celiac disease confirmed by intestinal biopsy or persistently high tissue transglutaminase autoantibody levels. Results: Of the 6605 children (49% females; median follow-up: 9.0 years [interquartile range, 8.0-10.0 years]), 1216 (18%) developed celiac disease autoimmunity and 447 (7%) developed celiac disease. The incidence for both outcomes peaked at the age of 2 to 3 years. Daily gluten intake was associated with higher risk of celiac disease autoimmunity for every 1-g/d increase in gluten consumption (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30 [95% CI, 1.22-1.38]; absolute risk by the age of 3 years if the reference amount of gluten was consumed, 28.1%; absolute risk if gluten intake was 1-g/d higher than the reference amount, 34.2%; absolute risk difference, 6.1% [95% CI, 4.5%-7.7%]). Daily gluten intake was associated with higher risk of celiac disease for every 1-g/d increase in gluten consumption (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.35-1.66]; absolute risk by age of 3 years if the reference amount of gluten was consumed, 20.7%; absolute risk if gluten intake was 1-g/d higher than the reference amount, 27.9%; absolute risk difference, 7.2% [95% CI, 6.1%-8.3%]). Conclusions and Relevance: Higher gluten intake during the first 5 years of life was associated with increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease among genetically predisposed children.

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JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
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322
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6
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10 pages
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American Medical Association
external identifiers
  • scopus:85070488089
ISSN
0098-7484
DOI
10.1001/jama.2019.10329
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English
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yes
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f340be06-2a98-4379-b133-c729a518b531
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2019-08-30 12:29:15
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2020-01-26 05:41:27
@article{f340be06-2a98-4379-b133-c729a518b531,
  abstract     = {<p>Importance: High gluten intake during childhood may confer risk of celiac disease. Objectives: To investigate if the amount of gluten intake is associated with celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease in genetically at-risk children. Design, Setting, and Participants: The participants in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY), a prospective observational birth cohort study designed to identify environmental triggers of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, were followed up at 6 clinical centers in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Between 2004 and 2010, 8676 newborns carrying HLA antigen genotypes associated with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease were enrolled. Screening for celiac disease with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies was performed annually in 6757 children from the age of 2 years. Data on gluten intake were available in 6605 children (98%) by September 30, 2017. Exposures: Gluten intake was estimated from 3-day food records collected at ages 6, 9, and 12 months and biannually thereafter until the age of 5 years. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was celiac disease autoimmunity, defined as positive tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies found in 2 consecutive serum samples. The secondary outcome was celiac disease confirmed by intestinal biopsy or persistently high tissue transglutaminase autoantibody levels. Results: Of the 6605 children (49% females; median follow-up: 9.0 years [interquartile range, 8.0-10.0 years]), 1216 (18%) developed celiac disease autoimmunity and 447 (7%) developed celiac disease. The incidence for both outcomes peaked at the age of 2 to 3 years. Daily gluten intake was associated with higher risk of celiac disease autoimmunity for every 1-g/d increase in gluten consumption (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30 [95% CI, 1.22-1.38]; absolute risk by the age of 3 years if the reference amount of gluten was consumed, 28.1%; absolute risk if gluten intake was 1-g/d higher than the reference amount, 34.2%; absolute risk difference, 6.1% [95% CI, 4.5%-7.7%]). Daily gluten intake was associated with higher risk of celiac disease for every 1-g/d increase in gluten consumption (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.35-1.66]; absolute risk by age of 3 years if the reference amount of gluten was consumed, 20.7%; absolute risk if gluten intake was 1-g/d higher than the reference amount, 27.9%; absolute risk difference, 7.2% [95% CI, 6.1%-8.3%]). Conclusions and Relevance: Higher gluten intake during the first 5 years of life was associated with increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease among genetically predisposed children.</p>},
  author       = {Andrén Aronsson, Carin and Lee, Hye Seung and Hård Af Segerstad, Elin M. and Uusitalo, Ulla and Yang, Jimin and Koletzko, Sibylle and Liu, Edwin and Kurppa, Kalle and Bingley, Polly J. and Toppari, Jorma and Ziegler, Anette G. and She, Jin Xiong and Hagopian, William A. and Rewers, Marian and Akolkar, Beena and Krischer, Jeffrey P. and Virtanen, Suvi M. and Norris, Jill M. and Agardh, Daniel},
  issn         = {0098-7484},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {514--523},
  publisher    = {American Medical Association},
  series       = {JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association},
  title        = {Association of gluten intake during the first 5 years of life with incidence of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease among children at increased risk},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.10329},
  doi          = {10.1001/jama.2019.10329},
  volume       = {322},
  year         = {2019},
}