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Incidence of hip fractures in Malmo, Sweden (1950-1991)

Gullberg, Bo LU ; Düppe, Henrik LU ; Nilsson, B; Redlund-Johnell, Inga LU ; Sernbo, Ingemar LU ; Obrant, Karl LU and Johnell, Olof LU (1993) In Bone 14(Suppl. 1). p.23-29
Abstract
In a 24-year sub-sample taken from a 42-year period of study (1950-1991), hip fracture incidence was analysed from a defined catchment area within one hospital. During this time, 8,256 hip fractures occurred in a generated risk population of 1,915,571 person-years. Crude incidence increased three-fold in women and five-fold in men. In men, the age-specific increase was twice as large as the age drift. In women, the two components were of equal size. The more marked increase in men caused the female:male ratio to decrease from 4.2 in 1950 to 2.4 in 1991. In men, all age classes experienced a significant yearly increase (1.6% in the 50-59 age group, 3.9% over the age of 80). In women, only the 70-79 and 80+ age groups showed a significant... (More)
In a 24-year sub-sample taken from a 42-year period of study (1950-1991), hip fracture incidence was analysed from a defined catchment area within one hospital. During this time, 8,256 hip fractures occurred in a generated risk population of 1,915,571 person-years. Crude incidence increased three-fold in women and five-fold in men. In men, the age-specific increase was twice as large as the age drift. In women, the two components were of equal size. The more marked increase in men caused the female:male ratio to decrease from 4.2 in 1950 to 2.4 in 1991. In men, all age classes experienced a significant yearly increase (1.6% in the 50-59 age group, 3.9% over the age of 80). In women, only the 70-79 and 80+ age groups showed a significant increase (1.4%, 2.3%). In the age-standardised curve, a levelling off occurred during the mid-80s. In women, this was attributable to changes in climate during wintertime. In men, no significant association was found with temperature. The age-standardised curve followed an approximate linear trend with an increase of 6.4/100,000/year in women and 4.9/100,000/year in men. The cumulative rate for the age group 50-79 years doubled in men but increased only by one-third in women. The impact of increasing incidence in men compared with women is discussed using an osteoporosis model consisting of base risk, senile risk, and post-menopausal risk. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Hip fracture, Incidence
in
Bone
volume
14
issue
Suppl. 1
pages
23 - 29
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:8110516
  • scopus:0027521780
ISSN
1873-2763
DOI
10.1016/8756-3282(93)90345-B
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4dd22eae-1ff0-4765-b43c-70f1a65b15b3 (old id 1107145)
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 12:22:23
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:28:35
@article{4dd22eae-1ff0-4765-b43c-70f1a65b15b3,
  abstract     = {In a 24-year sub-sample taken from a 42-year period of study (1950-1991), hip fracture incidence was analysed from a defined catchment area within one hospital. During this time, 8,256 hip fractures occurred in a generated risk population of 1,915,571 person-years. Crude incidence increased three-fold in women and five-fold in men. In men, the age-specific increase was twice as large as the age drift. In women, the two components were of equal size. The more marked increase in men caused the female:male ratio to decrease from 4.2 in 1950 to 2.4 in 1991. In men, all age classes experienced a significant yearly increase (1.6% in the 50-59 age group, 3.9% over the age of 80). In women, only the 70-79 and 80+ age groups showed a significant increase (1.4%, 2.3%). In the age-standardised curve, a levelling off occurred during the mid-80s. In women, this was attributable to changes in climate during wintertime. In men, no significant association was found with temperature. The age-standardised curve followed an approximate linear trend with an increase of 6.4/100,000/year in women and 4.9/100,000/year in men. The cumulative rate for the age group 50-79 years doubled in men but increased only by one-third in women. The impact of increasing incidence in men compared with women is discussed using an osteoporosis model consisting of base risk, senile risk, and post-menopausal risk.},
  author       = {Gullberg, Bo and Düppe, Henrik and Nilsson, B and Redlund-Johnell, Inga and Sernbo, Ingemar and Obrant, Karl and Johnell, Olof},
  issn         = {1873-2763},
  keyword      = {Hip fracture,Incidence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl. 1},
  pages        = {23--29},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Bone},
  title        = {Incidence of hip fractures in Malmo, Sweden (1950-1991)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/8756-3282(93)90345-B},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {1993},
}