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Neuroendocrine cells and nerves in the prostate of the guinea pig: effects of peripheral denervation and castration

Acosta, Stefan LU ; Dizeyi, Nishtman LU ; Pierzynowski, Stefan LU ; Alm, Per LU and Abrahamsson, Per-Anders LU (2001) In The Prostate 46(3). p.191-199
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine (NE) cells and nerves in the prostate gland are thought to play a central role in the regulation of growth, cellular differentiation and homeostasis of secretory activity. The objective of this experimental study was to describe the effects of peripheral denervation and castration on NE cells and nerves in the guinea pig prostate. METHODS: Guinea pigs underwent sham-operation, unilateral and bilateral hypogastric nerve resection, extirpation of the right anterior major pelvic ganglion (AMPG), autotransplantation of prostatic tissue and castration. Cryostat sections of prostatic tissue were examined with immunohistochemistry by using serotonin (5-HT) and chromogranin A (CgA) and various neuropeptides. RESULTS: The... (More)
BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine (NE) cells and nerves in the prostate gland are thought to play a central role in the regulation of growth, cellular differentiation and homeostasis of secretory activity. The objective of this experimental study was to describe the effects of peripheral denervation and castration on NE cells and nerves in the guinea pig prostate. METHODS: Guinea pigs underwent sham-operation, unilateral and bilateral hypogastric nerve resection, extirpation of the right anterior major pelvic ganglion (AMPG), autotransplantation of prostatic tissue and castration. Cryostat sections of prostatic tissue were examined with immunohistochemistry by using serotonin (5-HT) and chromogranin A (CgA) and various neuropeptides. RESULTS: The number of 5-HT-IR NE cells was four-fold higher than CgA-IR NE cells. The innervation pattern was uniform throughout the gland with subepithelial nerves in close proximity to NE cells. Autotransplants of prostatic tissue showed total loss of nerves, but the number and morphology of 5-HT-IR NE cells were unaltered. Extirpation of the right AMPG showed significant reduction in prostate weight, decreased density of nerve terminals in the superior part of the ipsilateral prostate, whereas the number and morphological feature of 5-HT-IR NE cells remained unaffected in the entire prostate. Castration induced atrophy of the gland with a significant reduction in weight (unpaired t-test, P < 0.001), but without effect upon 5-HT-IR NE cells. CONCLUSIONS: The guinea pig seems to be a useful animal model for studies on the role of the NE cells in the prostate. NE cells seem to be independent of innervation and androgens. It seems that other factors influence the NE cell population to a greater extent. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Prostate
volume
46
issue
3
pages
191 - 199
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:11170147
  • scopus:0035136231
ISSN
0270-4137
DOI
10.1002/1097-0045(20010215)46:3<191::AID-PROS1023>3.0.CO;2-D
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
feb1d7fc-3ed2-4646-9b7b-8ce4cea14159 (old id 1119742)
date added to LUP
2008-06-23 12:53:49
date last changed
2018-01-07 05:39:29
@article{feb1d7fc-3ed2-4646-9b7b-8ce4cea14159,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine (NE) cells and nerves in the prostate gland are thought to play a central role in the regulation of growth, cellular differentiation and homeostasis of secretory activity. The objective of this experimental study was to describe the effects of peripheral denervation and castration on NE cells and nerves in the guinea pig prostate. METHODS: Guinea pigs underwent sham-operation, unilateral and bilateral hypogastric nerve resection, extirpation of the right anterior major pelvic ganglion (AMPG), autotransplantation of prostatic tissue and castration. Cryostat sections of prostatic tissue were examined with immunohistochemistry by using serotonin (5-HT) and chromogranin A (CgA) and various neuropeptides. RESULTS: The number of 5-HT-IR NE cells was four-fold higher than CgA-IR NE cells. The innervation pattern was uniform throughout the gland with subepithelial nerves in close proximity to NE cells. Autotransplants of prostatic tissue showed total loss of nerves, but the number and morphology of 5-HT-IR NE cells were unaltered. Extirpation of the right AMPG showed significant reduction in prostate weight, decreased density of nerve terminals in the superior part of the ipsilateral prostate, whereas the number and morphological feature of 5-HT-IR NE cells remained unaffected in the entire prostate. Castration induced atrophy of the gland with a significant reduction in weight (unpaired t-test, P &lt; 0.001), but without effect upon 5-HT-IR NE cells. CONCLUSIONS: The guinea pig seems to be a useful animal model for studies on the role of the NE cells in the prostate. NE cells seem to be independent of innervation and androgens. It seems that other factors influence the NE cell population to a greater extent.},
  author       = {Acosta, Stefan and Dizeyi, Nishtman and Pierzynowski, Stefan and Alm, Per and Abrahamsson, Per-Anders},
  issn         = {0270-4137},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {191--199},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {The Prostate},
  title        = {Neuroendocrine cells and nerves in the prostate of the guinea pig: effects of peripheral denervation and castration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1097-0045(20010215)46:3<191::AID-PROS1023>3.0.CO;2-D},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2001},
}