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Importance of processing for physico-chemical and physiological properties of dietary fibre.

Nyman, Margareta LU (2003) In Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 62(1). p.187-192
Abstract
There is considerable loss of DM during wet heat treatment of vegetables, leading to an increase in dietary fibre. Correction for the loss of DM indicates that the effects on total dietary fibre are minor. There is, however, depolymerization of the dietary fibre polysaccharides. The degradation is related to the severity of the heat treatment. Souring, freezing and mild microwave treatment have no effects. The viscosity is in general related to the extent of polymerisation. Microwave treatment has different effects on various cultivars of green beans, and the addition of salt (NaCl and CaCl2) to the boiling water changes the physico-chemical properties of soluble fibre in carrots, depending on the cation. The higher viscosity of the... (More)
There is considerable loss of DM during wet heat treatment of vegetables, leading to an increase in dietary fibre. Correction for the loss of DM indicates that the effects on total dietary fibre are minor. There is, however, depolymerization of the dietary fibre polysaccharides. The degradation is related to the severity of the heat treatment. Souring, freezing and mild microwave treatment have no effects. The viscosity is in general related to the extent of polymerisation. Microwave treatment has different effects on various cultivars of green beans, and the addition of salt (NaCl and CaCl2) to the boiling water changes the physico-chemical properties of soluble fibre in carrots, depending on the cation. The higher viscosity of the soluble fibre in raw carrots may partly explain the lower glucose and hormonal responses observed in healthy subjects when compared with blanched and microwave-cooked carrots. In studies on rats the amount of butyric acid in the distal colon has been shown to be higher with dietary components containing high amounts of resistant starch. Further, the fermentability is lower and the butyric acid concentration higher with composite foods than with the corresponding purified fibre fractions. In human studies the faecal concentration of butyric acid has been shown to increase in patients with ulcerative colitis when β-glucan-enriched oat bran (20 g fibre) is added to the diet for 12 weeks. Also, an improvement of symptoms was reported. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Physico-chemical properties, Dietary fibre, Food processing, Butyric acid, Physiological effects
in
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
volume
62
issue
1
pages
187 - 192
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000182395100029
  • scopus:0038326839
ISSN
0029-6651
DOI
10.1079/PNS2002227
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
20a08583-5253-4787-8ec0-2acb5ca56d43 (old id 127829)
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 10:43:40
date last changed
2018-01-07 06:10:05
@article{20a08583-5253-4787-8ec0-2acb5ca56d43,
  abstract     = {There is considerable loss of DM during wet heat treatment of vegetables, leading to an increase in dietary fibre. Correction for the loss of DM indicates that the effects on total dietary fibre are minor. There is, however, depolymerization of the dietary fibre polysaccharides. The degradation is related to the severity of the heat treatment. Souring, freezing and mild microwave treatment have no effects. The viscosity is in general related to the extent of polymerisation. Microwave treatment has different effects on various cultivars of green beans, and the addition of salt (NaCl and CaCl2) to the boiling water changes the physico-chemical properties of soluble fibre in carrots, depending on the cation. The higher viscosity of the soluble fibre in raw carrots may partly explain the lower glucose and hormonal responses observed in healthy subjects when compared with blanched and microwave-cooked carrots. In studies on rats the amount of butyric acid in the distal colon has been shown to be higher with dietary components containing high amounts of resistant starch. Further, the fermentability is lower and the butyric acid concentration higher with composite foods than with the corresponding purified fibre fractions. In human studies the faecal concentration of butyric acid has been shown to increase in patients with ulcerative colitis when β-glucan-enriched oat bran (20 g fibre) is added to the diet for 12 weeks. Also, an improvement of symptoms was reported.},
  author       = {Nyman, Margareta},
  issn         = {0029-6651},
  keyword      = {Physico-chemical properties,Dietary fibre,Food processing,Butyric acid,Physiological effects},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {187--192},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Proceedings of the Nutrition Society},
  title        = {Importance of processing for physico-chemical and physiological properties of dietary fibre.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/PNS2002227},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2003},
}