Advanced

Socioeconomic differences in fat intake in a middle-aged population: report from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study

Lindström, Martin LU ; Hanson, Bertil S; Brunner, Eric; Wirfält, Elisabet LU ; Elmståhl, Sölve LU ; Mattisson, Iréne LU and Östergren, Per-Olof LU (2000) In International Journal of Epidemiology 29(3). p.438-448
Abstract
Background: The objective was to investigate whether socioeconomic differences in fat intake may explain socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular diseases. Methods: The Malm Diet and Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study. The baseline examinations used in the present cross-sectional study were undertaken in 19921994. Dietary habits were assessed using a modified diet history method consisting of a 7-day menu book and a 168-item questionnaire. A subpopulation of 11 837 individuals born 19261945 was investigated. This study examined high fat intake, defined as >35.9 among men and >34.8 among women (25 quartile limit) of the proportion of the non-alcohol energy intake contributed by fat. The subfractions saturated,... (More)
Background: The objective was to investigate whether socioeconomic differences in fat intake may explain socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular diseases. Methods: The Malm Diet and Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study. The baseline examinations used in the present cross-sectional study were undertaken in 19921994. Dietary habits were assessed using a modified diet history method consisting of a 7-day menu book and a 168-item questionnaire. A subpopulation of 11 837 individuals born 19261945 was investigated. This study examined high fat intake, defined as >35.9 among men and >34.8 among women (25 quartile limit) of the proportion of the non-alcohol energy intake contributed by fat. The subfractions saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids and the P:S ratio (polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids) were analysed in the same way. The uppermost quartile (75) of total and subgroup fat intake was also studied. Socioeconomic differences before and after adjustment for low energy reporting (LER), defined as energy intake below 1.2 x Basal Metabolic Rate, were examined. Results: No socioeconomic differences in fat intake were seen between the SES groups, except for self-employed men, and male and female pensioners. Approximately 20 in most SES groups were LER. The LER and body mass index were strongly related. The SES pattern of fat intake remained unchanged after adjustment for age, country of origin and LER in a logistic regression model. The results for the subfractions of fat and the P:S ratio did not principally differ from the total fat results. Conclusions: This study provides no evidence that fat intake contributes to the inverse socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular diseases. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Epidemiology
volume
29
issue
3
pages
438 - 448
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000088207900009
  • scopus:0033922810
ISSN
1464-3685
DOI
10.1093/ije/29.3.438
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
18785981-9c61-492d-abaf-6e10ba39c0df (old id 131710)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 15:49:50
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:48:40
@article{18785981-9c61-492d-abaf-6e10ba39c0df,
  abstract     = {Background: The objective was to investigate whether socioeconomic differences in fat intake may explain socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular diseases. Methods: The Malm Diet and Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study. The baseline examinations used in the present cross-sectional study were undertaken in 19921994. Dietary habits were assessed using a modified diet history method consisting of a 7-day menu book and a 168-item questionnaire. A subpopulation of 11 837 individuals born 19261945 was investigated. This study examined high fat intake, defined as >35.9 among men and >34.8 among women (25 quartile limit) of the proportion of the non-alcohol energy intake contributed by fat. The subfractions saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids and the P:S ratio (polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids) were analysed in the same way. The uppermost quartile (75) of total and subgroup fat intake was also studied. Socioeconomic differences before and after adjustment for low energy reporting (LER), defined as energy intake below 1.2 x Basal Metabolic Rate, were examined. Results: No socioeconomic differences in fat intake were seen between the SES groups, except for self-employed men, and male and female pensioners. Approximately 20 in most SES groups were LER. The LER and body mass index were strongly related. The SES pattern of fat intake remained unchanged after adjustment for age, country of origin and LER in a logistic regression model. The results for the subfractions of fat and the P:S ratio did not principally differ from the total fat results. Conclusions: This study provides no evidence that fat intake contributes to the inverse socioeconomic differences in cardiovascular diseases.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Hanson, Bertil S and Brunner, Eric and Wirfält, Elisabet and Elmståhl, Sölve and Mattisson, Iréne and Östergren, Per-Olof},
  issn         = {1464-3685},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {438--448},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {International Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Socioeconomic differences in fat intake in a middle-aged population: report from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/29.3.438},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2000},
}