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Anti-prothrombin antibodies are associated with thrombosis in children.

Rask, Olof LU ; Hillarp, Andreas LU ; Berntorp, Erik LU and Ljung, Rolf LU (2010) In Thrombosis Research 125. p.19-24
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This investigation aimed to evaluate thrombotic risk factors in children, with special reference to autoantibodies against prothrombin and protein S. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 57 consecutive Swedish children and adolescents referred with a radiologically confirmed acute thrombotic event. Clinical data were collected and a thrombophilia investigation was performed, including analysis of autoantibodies against protein S (anti-PS) and prothrombin (anti-PT). The anti-PS and anti-PT autoantibodies were also investigated in sera from 47 healthy controls. Detection of autoantibodies was performed by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Results for anti-PT antibodies were positive in 21% (12/57) of the... (More)
INTRODUCTION: This investigation aimed to evaluate thrombotic risk factors in children, with special reference to autoantibodies against prothrombin and protein S. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 57 consecutive Swedish children and adolescents referred with a radiologically confirmed acute thrombotic event. Clinical data were collected and a thrombophilia investigation was performed, including analysis of autoantibodies against protein S (anti-PS) and prothrombin (anti-PT). The anti-PS and anti-PT autoantibodies were also investigated in sera from 47 healthy controls. Detection of autoantibodies was performed by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Results for anti-PT antibodies were positive in 21% (12/57) of the patients and 2.1% (1/47) of the controls (OR 12.0, 95% CI 1.7-534; p=0.005). Seven percent (4/57) of the patients and 2.1% (1/47) of the controls were positive for anti-PS antibodies (OR 3.4, 95% CI 0.3-174; p>0.30). The FV G1691A mutation was found in 25% (14/57), and 44% (25/57) had 2 or more prothrombotic risk factors. Sixty percent (34/57) of the thrombosis patients were female. Peaks in frequency of thromboembolic events were found in the neonatal and the adolescent periods. Fifty-three percent (30/57) had thrombosis in the lower venous system. Associated clinical conditions occurred in 91% (52/57): systemic illness in 31% (18/57), infections in 26% (15/57), and oral contraceptive use in 25% (14/57). Four percent (2/57) had no apparent clinical or prothrombotic risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that anti-PT autoantibodies may be common risk factors for thrombosis in children, and it confirms the multifactorial nature of pediatric thrombosis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Thrombosis Research
volume
125
pages
19 - 24
publisher
Elsevier Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000274937100006
  • pmid:19303627
  • scopus:76449084887
ISSN
1879-2472
DOI
10.1016/j.thromres.2009.02.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
864daa38-5091-4e32-8281-62197370c416 (old id 1367584)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19303627?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-04-07 15:23:08
date last changed
2018-06-07 12:00:37
@article{864daa38-5091-4e32-8281-62197370c416,
  abstract     = {INTRODUCTION: This investigation aimed to evaluate thrombotic risk factors in children, with special reference to autoantibodies against prothrombin and protein S. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 57 consecutive Swedish children and adolescents referred with a radiologically confirmed acute thrombotic event. Clinical data were collected and a thrombophilia investigation was performed, including analysis of autoantibodies against protein S (anti-PS) and prothrombin (anti-PT). The anti-PS and anti-PT autoantibodies were also investigated in sera from 47 healthy controls. Detection of autoantibodies was performed by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Results for anti-PT antibodies were positive in 21% (12/57) of the patients and 2.1% (1/47) of the controls (OR 12.0, 95% CI 1.7-534; p=0.005). Seven percent (4/57) of the patients and 2.1% (1/47) of the controls were positive for anti-PS antibodies (OR 3.4, 95% CI 0.3-174; p>0.30). The FV G1691A mutation was found in 25% (14/57), and 44% (25/57) had 2 or more prothrombotic risk factors. Sixty percent (34/57) of the thrombosis patients were female. Peaks in frequency of thromboembolic events were found in the neonatal and the adolescent periods. Fifty-three percent (30/57) had thrombosis in the lower venous system. Associated clinical conditions occurred in 91% (52/57): systemic illness in 31% (18/57), infections in 26% (15/57), and oral contraceptive use in 25% (14/57). Four percent (2/57) had no apparent clinical or prothrombotic risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that anti-PT autoantibodies may be common risk factors for thrombosis in children, and it confirms the multifactorial nature of pediatric thrombosis.},
  author       = {Rask, Olof and Hillarp, Andreas and Berntorp, Erik and Ljung, Rolf},
  issn         = {1879-2472},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {19--24},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Ltd},
  series       = {Thrombosis Research},
  title        = {Anti-prothrombin antibodies are associated with thrombosis in children.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2009.02.007},
  volume       = {125},
  year         = {2010},
}