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Competitive adsorption between beta-casein or beta-lactoglobulin and model milk membrane lipids at oil-water interfaces

Waninge, Rianne LU ; Walstra, P; Bastiaans, J; Nieuwenhuijse, H; Nylander, Tommy LU ; Paulsson, Marie LU and Bergenståhl, Björn LU (2005) In Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 53(3). p.716-724
Abstract
This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum depletion technique. The membrane lipid mixture used was a model milk membrane lipid system, containing dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, milk sphingomyelin, dioleoylphosphatidylserine, and soybean phosphatidylinositol. The model composition mimics the lipid composition of natural milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were studied for two proteins, beta-lactoglobulin and P-casein. The mixing order was varied to... (More)
This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum depletion technique. The membrane lipid mixture used was a model milk membrane lipid system, containing dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, milk sphingomyelin, dioleoylphosphatidylserine, and soybean phosphatidylinositol. The model composition mimics the lipid composition of natural milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were studied for two proteins, beta-lactoglobulin and P-casein. The mixing order was varied to allow for differentiation between equilibrium structures and nonequilibrium structures. The results showed more than monolayer adsorption for most combinations. Proteins dominated at the oil-water interface in the protein-emulsified emulsion even after 48 h of exposure to a vesicular dispersion of membrane lipids. The membrane lipids dominated the oil-water interface in the case of the membrane lipid emulsified emulsion even after equilibration with a protein solution. Protein displacement with time was observed only for emulsions in which both membrane lipids and beta-casein were included during the emulsification, This study shows that kinetics controls the structures rather than the thermodynamic equilibrium, possibly resulting in structures more complex than an adsorbed monolayer. Thus, it can be expected that procedures such as the mixing order during emulsion preparation are of crucial importance to the emulsification performance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
volume
53
issue
3
pages
716 - 724
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000226782900034
  • pmid:15686425
  • scopus:13244271973
ISSN
0021-8561
DOI
10.1021/jf049267y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f671bb0-33da-4bae-88ba-5b264698608c (old id 152868)
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 13:48:44
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:35:03
@article{2f671bb0-33da-4bae-88ba-5b264698608c,
  abstract     = {This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum depletion technique. The membrane lipid mixture used was a model milk membrane lipid system, containing dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, milk sphingomyelin, dioleoylphosphatidylserine, and soybean phosphatidylinositol. The model composition mimics the lipid composition of natural milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were studied for two proteins, beta-lactoglobulin and P-casein. The mixing order was varied to allow for differentiation between equilibrium structures and nonequilibrium structures. The results showed more than monolayer adsorption for most combinations. Proteins dominated at the oil-water interface in the protein-emulsified emulsion even after 48 h of exposure to a vesicular dispersion of membrane lipids. The membrane lipids dominated the oil-water interface in the case of the membrane lipid emulsified emulsion even after equilibration with a protein solution. Protein displacement with time was observed only for emulsions in which both membrane lipids and beta-casein were included during the emulsification, This study shows that kinetics controls the structures rather than the thermodynamic equilibrium, possibly resulting in structures more complex than an adsorbed monolayer. Thus, it can be expected that procedures such as the mixing order during emulsion preparation are of crucial importance to the emulsification performance.},
  author       = {Waninge, Rianne and Walstra, P and Bastiaans, J and Nieuwenhuijse, H and Nylander, Tommy and Paulsson, Marie and Bergenståhl, Björn},
  issn         = {0021-8561},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {716--724},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry},
  title        = {Competitive adsorption between beta-casein or beta-lactoglobulin and model milk membrane lipids at oil-water interfaces},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf049267y},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2005},
}