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Virtual Blindness - A Choice Blindness Experiment with a Virtual Experimenter

Lingonblad, Martin; Londos, Ludvig; Nilsson, Arvid; Boman, Emil; Nirme, Jens LU and Haake, Magnus LU (2015) 15th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents (IVA) In Intelligent Virtual Agents 9238. p.442-451
Abstract
How are people facing a virtual agent affected by the vividness and graphical fidelity of the agent and its environment? A choice blindness (CB) experiment - measuring detection rate of hidden manipulations - was conducted presenting a high versus low immersion virtual environment. The hypothesis was that the lower quality virtual environment (low immersion) would increase the detection rate for the CB manipulations. 38 subjects participated in the experiment and were randomized into two groups (high and low immersion). Both conditions presented a virtual agent conducting the CB experiment. During the experiment, 16 pairs of portraits were shown two at a time for the participants who were then asked to choose which portrait they found most... (More)
How are people facing a virtual agent affected by the vividness and graphical fidelity of the agent and its environment? A choice blindness (CB) experiment - measuring detection rate of hidden manipulations - was conducted presenting a high versus low immersion virtual environment. The hypothesis was that the lower quality virtual environment (low immersion) would increase the detection rate for the CB manipulations. 38 subjects participated in the experiment and were randomized into two groups (high and low immersion). Both conditions presented a virtual agent conducting the CB experiment. During the experiment, 16 pairs of portraits were shown two at a time for the participants who were then asked to choose which portrait they found most attractive. For eight of the pairs, participants were asked to justify their choice while in four cases their choice had been secretly switched to the portrait they had not chosen. If a participant stated that the chosen portrait had been switched, it was annotated as a concurrent detection. The results revealed an increase in detection and earlier detection rate for the low immersion implementation compared to the high immersion implementation. Future research may involve experiments with higher degree of both immersion and presence, using for example head mounted display systems. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Virtual agent, Choice blindness, Attention, Presence, Immersion
in
Intelligent Virtual Agents
volume
9238
pages
442 - 451
publisher
Springer
conference name
15th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents (IVA)
external identifiers
  • wos:000363485400047
  • scopus:84943618643
ISSN
1611-3349
0302-9743
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-21996-7_47
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
282f44a7-04a9-4755-b818-2388a93809cd (old id 8201701)
date added to LUP
2015-11-26 12:43:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:04:12
@inproceedings{282f44a7-04a9-4755-b818-2388a93809cd,
  abstract     = {How are people facing a virtual agent affected by the vividness and graphical fidelity of the agent and its environment? A choice blindness (CB) experiment - measuring detection rate of hidden manipulations - was conducted presenting a high versus low immersion virtual environment. The hypothesis was that the lower quality virtual environment (low immersion) would increase the detection rate for the CB manipulations. 38 subjects participated in the experiment and were randomized into two groups (high and low immersion). Both conditions presented a virtual agent conducting the CB experiment. During the experiment, 16 pairs of portraits were shown two at a time for the participants who were then asked to choose which portrait they found most attractive. For eight of the pairs, participants were asked to justify their choice while in four cases their choice had been secretly switched to the portrait they had not chosen. If a participant stated that the chosen portrait had been switched, it was annotated as a concurrent detection. The results revealed an increase in detection and earlier detection rate for the low immersion implementation compared to the high immersion implementation. Future research may involve experiments with higher degree of both immersion and presence, using for example head mounted display systems.},
  author       = {Lingonblad, Martin and Londos, Ludvig and Nilsson, Arvid and Boman, Emil and Nirme, Jens and Haake, Magnus},
  booktitle    = {Intelligent Virtual Agents},
  issn         = {1611-3349},
  keyword      = {Virtual agent,Choice blindness,Attention,Presence,Immersion},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {442--451},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Virtual Blindness - A Choice Blindness Experiment with a Virtual Experimenter},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21996-7_47},
  volume       = {9238},
  year         = {2015},
}