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An Examination of the Possibility of Lowering the Glycemic Index of Oat and Barley Flakes by Minimal Processing

Granfeldt, Yvonne LU ; Eliasson, Ann-Charlotte LU and Björck, Inger LU (2000) In Journal of Nutrition 130(9). p.2207-2214
Abstract
Differences in glycemic responses to various starchy foods are related to differences in the rate of

starch digestion and absorption. In this study, the importance of the degree of gelatinization and the product

thickness for postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to rolled oats and barley were studied in healthy

subjects (5 men and 5 women). Thick (1.0 mm) rolled oats were made from raw or preheated (roasted or steamed)

kernels. In addition, thin (0.5 mm) rolled oats were made from roasted or roasted and steamed (processed under

conditions simulating commercial production) oat kernels. Finally, steamed rolled barley kernels (0.5 or 1.0 mm)

were prepared. All thin flakes... (More)
Differences in glycemic responses to various starchy foods are related to differences in the rate of

starch digestion and absorption. In this study, the importance of the degree of gelatinization and the product

thickness for postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to rolled oats and barley were studied in healthy

subjects (5 men and 5 women). Thick (1.0 mm) rolled oats were made from raw or preheated (roasted or steamed)

kernels. In addition, thin (0.5 mm) rolled oats were made from roasted or roasted and steamed (processed under

conditions simulating commercial production) oat kernels. Finally, steamed rolled barley kernels (0.5 or 1.0 mm)

were prepared. All thin flakes elicited high glucose and insulin responses [glycemic index (GI), 88–118; insulinemic

index (II), 84–102], not significantly different from white wheat bread (P . 0.05). In contrast, all varieties of thick

oat flakes gave significantly lower metabolic responses (GI, 70–78; II, 58–77) than the reference bread (P , 0.05).

Thick barley flakes, however, gave high glucose and insulin responses (GI, 94; II, 84), probably because the

botanical structure underwent more destruction than the corresponding oat flakes. We conclude that minimal

processing of oat and barley flakes had a relatively minor effect on GI features compared with the more extensive

commercial processing. One exception was thick oat flakes, which in contrast to the corresponding barley flakes,

had a low GI. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
glycemic index oats barley humans
in
Journal of Nutrition
volume
130
issue
9
pages
2207 - 2214
publisher
American Society for Nutrition
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033851470
ISSN
1541-6100
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
477cc8c8-e7ef-4ebc-b292-b5ababb6620a (old id 3053995)
alternative location
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/130/9/2207.full
date added to LUP
2012-09-18 16:33:02
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:28:19
@article{477cc8c8-e7ef-4ebc-b292-b5ababb6620a,
  abstract     = {Differences in glycemic responses to various starchy foods are related to differences in the rate of<br/><br>
starch digestion and absorption. In this study, the importance of the degree of gelatinization and the product<br/><br>
thickness for postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to rolled oats and barley were studied in healthy<br/><br>
subjects (5 men and 5 women). Thick (1.0 mm) rolled oats were made from raw or preheated (roasted or steamed)<br/><br>
kernels. In addition, thin (0.5 mm) rolled oats were made from roasted or roasted and steamed (processed under<br/><br>
conditions simulating commercial production) oat kernels. Finally, steamed rolled barley kernels (0.5 or 1.0 mm)<br/><br>
were prepared. All thin flakes elicited high glucose and insulin responses [glycemic index (GI), 88–118; insulinemic<br/><br>
index (II), 84–102], not significantly different from white wheat bread (P . 0.05). In contrast, all varieties of thick<br/><br>
oat flakes gave significantly lower metabolic responses (GI, 70–78; II, 58–77) than the reference bread (P , 0.05).<br/><br>
Thick barley flakes, however, gave high glucose and insulin responses (GI, 94; II, 84), probably because the<br/><br>
botanical structure underwent more destruction than the corresponding oat flakes. We conclude that minimal<br/><br>
processing of oat and barley flakes had a relatively minor effect on GI features compared with the more extensive<br/><br>
commercial processing. One exception was thick oat flakes, which in contrast to the corresponding barley flakes,<br/><br>
had a low GI.},
  author       = {Granfeldt, Yvonne and Eliasson, Ann-Charlotte and Björck, Inger},
  issn         = {1541-6100},
  keyword      = {glycemic index oats barley humans},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2207--2214},
  publisher    = {American Society for Nutrition},
  series       = {Journal of Nutrition},
  title        = {An Examination of the Possibility of Lowering the Glycemic Index of Oat and Barley Flakes by Minimal Processing},
  volume       = {130},
  year         = {2000},
}