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O/W emulsions stabilized by OSA-modified starch granules versus non-ionic surfactant : Stability, rheological behaviour and resveratrol encapsulation

Matos, M.; Laca, A.; Rea, F.; Iglesias, O.; Rayner, M. LU and Gutiérrez, G. (2018) In Journal of Food Engineering 222. p.207-217
Abstract

Resveratrol is a natural phenol with many positive effects for human health. However it is a photosensitive molecule with geometric isomerism, easily oxidised with short biological half-life and rapid metabolism and elimination. Thus, encapsulation of resveratrol is necessary. It has low solubility in water and in most of common oils. The goal of this work was to prepare oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by quinoa starch particles containing resveratrol. Quinoa starch particles were modified with Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA) (degree of substitution 1.8%) to make them less hydrophilic. In order to compare starch effectivity as stabilizer, a common non-ionic surfactant Tween 20 was used to formulate surfactant stabilized emulsions. As... (More)

Resveratrol is a natural phenol with many positive effects for human health. However it is a photosensitive molecule with geometric isomerism, easily oxidised with short biological half-life and rapid metabolism and elimination. Thus, encapsulation of resveratrol is necessary. It has low solubility in water and in most of common oils. The goal of this work was to prepare oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by quinoa starch particles containing resveratrol. Quinoa starch particles were modified with Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA) (degree of substitution 1.8%) to make them less hydrophilic. In order to compare starch effectivity as stabilizer, a common non-ionic surfactant Tween 20 was used to formulate surfactant stabilized emulsions. As dispersed phase a mixture of miglyol and orange oil in a volume ratio 1:9 was used in order to increase resveratrol solubility in the oily phase. Both types of emulsions were formulated in full coverage conditions with similar mean droplet size. Thus, differences in the emulsions properties observed only depend on the type of emulsifier. Pickering emulsions stabilized by OSA-modified quinoa starch granules resulted more stable against creaming phenomena. The rheological behaviour was influenced by the type and the amount of dispersed phase used. Resveratrol encapsulation results revealed that formulations based on starch Pickering emulsions are an appropriate resveratrol carrier system for further use in functional food formulations, better than surfactant stabilized emulsions, leading to encapsulation efficiency (EE) values up to 98%, being more than twice that of the surfactant stabilized systems.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Emulsions, Encapsulation, Pickering, Resveratrol, Starch, Tween 20
in
Journal of Food Engineering
volume
222
pages
11 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85035013914
ISSN
0260-8774
DOI
10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2017.11.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4009630d-71dd-47b8-960e-7712c4470748
date added to LUP
2017-12-07 09:39:03
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:27:21
@article{4009630d-71dd-47b8-960e-7712c4470748,
  abstract     = {<p>Resveratrol is a natural phenol with many positive effects for human health. However it is a photosensitive molecule with geometric isomerism, easily oxidised with short biological half-life and rapid metabolism and elimination. Thus, encapsulation of resveratrol is necessary. It has low solubility in water and in most of common oils. The goal of this work was to prepare oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by quinoa starch particles containing resveratrol. Quinoa starch particles were modified with Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA) (degree of substitution 1.8%) to make them less hydrophilic. In order to compare starch effectivity as stabilizer, a common non-ionic surfactant Tween 20 was used to formulate surfactant stabilized emulsions. As dispersed phase a mixture of miglyol and orange oil in a volume ratio 1:9 was used in order to increase resveratrol solubility in the oily phase. Both types of emulsions were formulated in full coverage conditions with similar mean droplet size. Thus, differences in the emulsions properties observed only depend on the type of emulsifier. Pickering emulsions stabilized by OSA-modified quinoa starch granules resulted more stable against creaming phenomena. The rheological behaviour was influenced by the type and the amount of dispersed phase used. Resveratrol encapsulation results revealed that formulations based on starch Pickering emulsions are an appropriate resveratrol carrier system for further use in functional food formulations, better than surfactant stabilized emulsions, leading to encapsulation efficiency (EE) values up to 98%, being more than twice that of the surfactant stabilized systems.</p>},
  author       = {Matos, M. and Laca, A. and Rea, F. and Iglesias, O. and Rayner, M. and Gutiérrez, G.},
  issn         = {0260-8774},
  keyword      = {Emulsions,Encapsulation,Pickering,Resveratrol,Starch,Tween 20},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  pages        = {207--217},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Food Engineering},
  title        = {O/W emulsions stabilized by OSA-modified starch granules versus non-ionic surfactant : Stability, rheological behaviour and resveratrol encapsulation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2017.11.009},
  volume       = {222},
  year         = {2018},
}