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Smoking is associated with a worse self-reported health status in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from a Swedish population-based cohort.

Bremander, Ann LU ; Jacobsson, Lennart LU ; Bergman, Stefan LU ; Haglund, Emma LU ; Löfvendahl, Sofia LU and Petersson, Ingemar LU (2015) In Clinical Rheumatology 34(3). p.579-583
Abstract
The aim was to study possible associations between smoking habits and self-reported clinical features in a large population-based cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All subjects with PsA who had sought health care in the period 2003-2007 were identified using a regional health-care register. In 2009, all those identified who were 18 years of age or more (n = 2,003) were sent a questionnaire with questions on smoking, health-related quality of life [EuroQol five-dimension (EQ-5D)questionnaire], function [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)], pain, fatigue, and global health. We performed age- and sex-adjusted regression analysis to compare health status outcomes in never and ever smokers. Altogether, 1,185 subjects (59 %)... (More)
The aim was to study possible associations between smoking habits and self-reported clinical features in a large population-based cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All subjects with PsA who had sought health care in the period 2003-2007 were identified using a regional health-care register. In 2009, all those identified who were 18 years of age or more (n = 2,003) were sent a questionnaire with questions on smoking, health-related quality of life [EuroQol five-dimension (EQ-5D)questionnaire], function [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)], pain, fatigue, and global health. We performed age- and sex-adjusted regression analysis to compare health status outcomes in never and ever smokers. Altogether, 1,185 subjects (59 %) returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 57 years (SD 13.5), and 58 % were women; 38 % were never smokers and 62 % were ever smokers. Mean age at disease onset was 38.2 years (SD 13.2) and 41.2 years (SD 13.6), respectively (p = 0.001). In age- and sex-adjusted data, ever smokers reported worse EQ-5D (p = 0.009); worse reports of global health (p = 0.01), pain (p = 0.01), and fatigue (p = 0.04); and a higher number of painful body regions (p = 0.04) compared to never smokers. In this population-based PsA cohort, patients who were ever smokers reported worse health status than never smokers. Besides being a possible result of a worse PsA in ever smokers, impaired health status could also be an effect of unstudied comorbidities. Further longitudinal studies are needed to gain a better understanding of cause and effect. However, smoking cessation should be recommended because of general health considerations as well as disease-specific issues. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Rheumatology
volume
34
issue
3
pages
579 - 583
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:25024097
  • wos:000350677600023
  • scopus:84924297477
ISSN
1434-9949
DOI
10.1007/s10067-014-2742-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95469c75-b084-4b10-a2e1-b55827d3e396 (old id 4582298)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25024097?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-08-07 23:41:56
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:06:03
@article{95469c75-b084-4b10-a2e1-b55827d3e396,
  abstract     = {The aim was to study possible associations between smoking habits and self-reported clinical features in a large population-based cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All subjects with PsA who had sought health care in the period 2003-2007 were identified using a regional health-care register. In 2009, all those identified who were 18 years of age or more (n = 2,003) were sent a questionnaire with questions on smoking, health-related quality of life [EuroQol five-dimension (EQ-5D)questionnaire], function [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)], pain, fatigue, and global health. We performed age- and sex-adjusted regression analysis to compare health status outcomes in never and ever smokers. Altogether, 1,185 subjects (59 %) returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 57 years (SD 13.5), and 58 % were women; 38 % were never smokers and 62 % were ever smokers. Mean age at disease onset was 38.2 years (SD 13.2) and 41.2 years (SD 13.6), respectively (p = 0.001). In age- and sex-adjusted data, ever smokers reported worse EQ-5D (p = 0.009); worse reports of global health (p = 0.01), pain (p = 0.01), and fatigue (p = 0.04); and a higher number of painful body regions (p = 0.04) compared to never smokers. In this population-based PsA cohort, patients who were ever smokers reported worse health status than never smokers. Besides being a possible result of a worse PsA in ever smokers, impaired health status could also be an effect of unstudied comorbidities. Further longitudinal studies are needed to gain a better understanding of cause and effect. However, smoking cessation should be recommended because of general health considerations as well as disease-specific issues.},
  author       = {Bremander, Ann and Jacobsson, Lennart and Bergman, Stefan and Haglund, Emma and Löfvendahl, Sofia and Petersson, Ingemar},
  issn         = {1434-9949},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {579--583},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Clinical Rheumatology},
  title        = {Smoking is associated with a worse self-reported health status in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from a Swedish population-based cohort.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-014-2742-8},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2015},
}