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Modified stainless steel surfaces targeted to reduce fouling - Evaluation of fouling by milk components

Rosmaninho, Roxane; Santos, Olga LU ; Nylander, Tommy LU ; Paulsson, Marie LU ; Beuf, Morgane; Benezech, Thierry; Yiantsios, Stergios; Andritsos, Nikolaos; Karabelas, Anastasios and Rizzo, Gerhard, et al. (2007) In Journal of Food Engineering 80(4). p.1176-1187
Abstract
Several stainless steel based surfaces with different properties were evaluated according to their fouling behaviour for different dairy products under different conditions. Surface properties were obtained by the following modification techniques: SiF3+, MoS22+ and TiC ion implantation; diamond-like carbon (DLC) sputtering; DLC, DLC-Si-O and SiOx, plasma enhanced chemical vapor Deposition (PECVD); autocatalytic Ni-P-PTFE and silica coating. Aqueous solutions that simulate milk (SMUF - simulated milk ultrafiltrate for the mineral components, beta-lactoglobulin for the protein components and FMF - fouling model fluid for complex milk systems) were used to study the fouling behaviour during pasteurisation. Bacteriological deposition studies... (More)
Several stainless steel based surfaces with different properties were evaluated according to their fouling behaviour for different dairy products under different conditions. Surface properties were obtained by the following modification techniques: SiF3+, MoS22+ and TiC ion implantation; diamond-like carbon (DLC) sputtering; DLC, DLC-Si-O and SiOx, plasma enhanced chemical vapor Deposition (PECVD); autocatalytic Ni-P-PTFE and silica coating. Aqueous solutions that simulate milk (SMUF - simulated milk ultrafiltrate for the mineral components, beta-lactoglobulin for the protein components and FMF - fouling model fluid for complex milk systems) were used to study the fouling behaviour during pasteurisation. Bacteriological deposition studies were also performed with two heat resistant strains of Bacillus. The experiments were carried out at laboratory scale for the evaluation of calcium phosphate and protein deposition, and at pilot scale for adhesion of bacteria and deposits from complex milk systems. In all cases, the fouling behaviour was affected by the surface material, although in different ways for the deposition or the cleaning phases. For the non-microbiological deposits (calcium phosphate, whey protein and FMF milk-based product), the Ni-P-PTFE surface was the most promising one, since it generally promoted less deposit build up and, in all cases, was the easiest to clean. On the other hand, for bacterial adhesion, the most suitable surface was the ion implanted (TiC) surface, which also showed less spores after the cleaning process. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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keywords
beta-lactoglobulin, calcium phosphate, modified stainless steel, fouling, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus
in
Journal of Food Engineering
volume
80
issue
4
pages
1176 - 1187
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000244544200021
  • scopus:33846220615
ISSN
0260-8774
DOI
10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.09.008
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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e23644e8-ba7e-427b-a5d6-8e04f964976f (old id 672622)
date added to LUP
2007-12-21 12:48:03
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2017-10-01 04:46:42
@article{e23644e8-ba7e-427b-a5d6-8e04f964976f,
  abstract     = {Several stainless steel based surfaces with different properties were evaluated according to their fouling behaviour for different dairy products under different conditions. Surface properties were obtained by the following modification techniques: SiF3+, MoS22+ and TiC ion implantation; diamond-like carbon (DLC) sputtering; DLC, DLC-Si-O and SiOx, plasma enhanced chemical vapor Deposition (PECVD); autocatalytic Ni-P-PTFE and silica coating. Aqueous solutions that simulate milk (SMUF - simulated milk ultrafiltrate for the mineral components, beta-lactoglobulin for the protein components and FMF - fouling model fluid for complex milk systems) were used to study the fouling behaviour during pasteurisation. Bacteriological deposition studies were also performed with two heat resistant strains of Bacillus. The experiments were carried out at laboratory scale for the evaluation of calcium phosphate and protein deposition, and at pilot scale for adhesion of bacteria and deposits from complex milk systems. In all cases, the fouling behaviour was affected by the surface material, although in different ways for the deposition or the cleaning phases. For the non-microbiological deposits (calcium phosphate, whey protein and FMF milk-based product), the Ni-P-PTFE surface was the most promising one, since it generally promoted less deposit build up and, in all cases, was the easiest to clean. On the other hand, for bacterial adhesion, the most suitable surface was the ion implanted (TiC) surface, which also showed less spores after the cleaning process. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Rosmaninho, Roxane and Santos, Olga and Nylander, Tommy and Paulsson, Marie and Beuf, Morgane and Benezech, Thierry and Yiantsios, Stergios and Andritsos, Nikolaos and Karabelas, Anastasios and Rizzo, Gerhard and Mueller-Steinhagen, Hans and Melo, Luis F.},
  issn         = {0260-8774},
  keyword      = {beta-lactoglobulin,calcium phosphate,modified stainless steel,fouling,Bacillus subtilis,Bacillus cereus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1176--1187},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Food Engineering},
  title        = {Modified stainless steel surfaces targeted to reduce fouling - Evaluation of fouling by milk components},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.09.008},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2007},
}