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Predominance of caudate nucleus lesions in acute ischemic stroke patients with impairments in language and speech

Grönholm, Erik; Roll, Mikael LU ; Horne, Merle LU ; Sundgren, Pia LU and Lindgren, Arne LU (2016) In European Journal of Neurology 23(1). p.148-153
Abstract
Background and purpose. Whereas traditional views of language processing in the brain have assumed that the language function is concentrated to a limited number of cortical areas (Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas), current knowledge points at a much more complex system of language and speech processing involving many brain areas, both cortical and subcortical. The purpose of the current study was to make an unbiased assessment of which cerebral areas are affected in first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients identified as having language and speech impairments according to the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).

Methods. Data from thirty-four patients with language and speech impairments, with a score of 1-3 on item 9... (More)
Background and purpose. Whereas traditional views of language processing in the brain have assumed that the language function is concentrated to a limited number of cortical areas (Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas), current knowledge points at a much more complex system of language and speech processing involving many brain areas, both cortical and subcortical. The purpose of the current study was to make an unbiased assessment of which cerebral areas are affected in first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients identified as having language and speech impairments according to the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).

Methods. Data from thirty-four patients with language and speech impairments, with a score of 1-3 on item 9 on the NIHSS, following ischemic stroke was collected from the Lund Stroke Register. MRI images acquired up to 20 days after stroke onset were used to create an overlap lesion image using MRIcron software.

Results. The classical language areas, Wernicke’s and Broca’s area, were affected in less than one fourth of the patients. The most frequently affected region was a subcortical region - the left caudate nucleus and the adjacent corona radiata.

Conclusions. These findings contribute to the growing body of evidence that the basal ganglia have a crucial role in the control over language and speech processing. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
caudate nucleus, stroke, speech, language, MRI, basal ganglia
in
European Journal of Neurology
volume
23
issue
1
pages
148 - 153
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000368238700022
  • scopus:84955212299
  • pmid:26268364
ISSN
1351-5101
DOI
10.1111/ene.12822
project
Humanities and Medicine (HuMe)
Images of tones: fMRI-studies on the processing of prosody in the human brain
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
69bd5ae0-13e8-4e97-bb66-8ffaed787c21 (old id 4253258)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26268364?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-08-27 14:11:08
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:09:36
@article{69bd5ae0-13e8-4e97-bb66-8ffaed787c21,
  abstract     = {Background and purpose. Whereas traditional views of language processing in the brain have assumed that the language function is concentrated to a limited number of cortical areas (Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas), current knowledge points at a much more complex system of language and speech processing involving many brain areas, both cortical and subcortical. The purpose of the current study was to make an unbiased assessment of which cerebral areas are affected in first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients identified as having language and speech impairments according to the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).<br/><br>
Methods. Data from thirty-four patients with language and speech impairments, with a score of 1-3 on item 9 on the NIHSS, following ischemic stroke was collected from the Lund Stroke Register. MRI images acquired up to 20 days after stroke onset were used to create an overlap lesion image using MRIcron software.<br/><br>
Results. The classical language areas, Wernicke’s and Broca’s area, were affected in less than one fourth of the patients. The most frequently affected region was a subcortical region - the left caudate nucleus and the adjacent corona radiata.<br/><br>
Conclusions. These findings contribute to the growing body of evidence that the basal ganglia have a crucial role in the control over language and speech processing.},
  author       = {Grönholm, Erik and Roll, Mikael and Horne, Merle and Sundgren, Pia and Lindgren, Arne},
  issn         = {1351-5101},
  keyword      = {caudate nucleus,stroke,speech,language,MRI,basal ganglia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {148--153},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {European Journal of Neurology},
  title        = {Predominance of caudate nucleus lesions in acute ischemic stroke patients with impairments in language and speech},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ene.12822},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2016},
}