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Increased cancer risk in offspring of women with colorectal carcinoma : a Swedish register-based cohort study

Planck, M LU ; Anderson, H LU ; Bladström, A LU ; Möller, Torgil LU ; Wenngren, E and Olsson, Håkan LU (2000) In Cancer 89(4). p.9-741
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies in the Western population, and a considerable proportion of colorectal carcinomas are estimated to have a familial background.

METHODS: Individuals whose mothers were diagnosed with colon carcinoma or rectal carcinoma from 1958 to 1993, a total of 1. 48 million person-years, constituted the cohort of this Swedish population-based register study. The children were born during the period 1941-1993, and the cancer incidence was observed during the period 1961-1993, with the expected national Swedish incidence used as a reference.

RESULTS: A significantly increased risk of colon carcinoma, rectal carcinoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma was observed in the... (More)

BACKGROUND: Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies in the Western population, and a considerable proportion of colorectal carcinomas are estimated to have a familial background.

METHODS: Individuals whose mothers were diagnosed with colon carcinoma or rectal carcinoma from 1958 to 1993, a total of 1. 48 million person-years, constituted the cohort of this Swedish population-based register study. The children were born during the period 1941-1993, and the cancer incidence was observed during the period 1961-1993, with the expected national Swedish incidence used as a reference.

RESULTS: A significantly increased risk of colon carcinoma, rectal carcinoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma was observed in the cohort. The cancer risk was more pronounced in children whose mothers were age < 50 years at the time of diagnosis or had developed metachronous colorectal carcinoma. Whereas colon carcinoma in the proband implied an increased risk for both colon tumors and rectal tumors, the offspring of women who were diagnosed with rectal carcinoma were at increased risk of developing rectal carcinoma, but no significantly altered risk of colon carcinoma was observed. In the cohort, the cumulative risk for colorectal carcinoma before age 50 years was increased about 3.0 times compared with the general population.

CONCLUSIONS: This report shows a significant familial aggregation of colorectal carcinoma, demonstrates possible differences in hereditary pattern between colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma, and confirms that younger age at the time of diagnosis or the occurrence of metachronous tumors indicate familial carcinoma.

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organization
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cohort Studies, Colonic Neoplasms, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Incidence, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin, Male, Middle Aged, Rectal Neoplasms, Registries, Risk Factors, Sweden
in
Cancer
volume
89
issue
4
pages
9 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034663053
ISSN
0008-543X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
88cdfaa4-83c9-4ef2-bed0-22424b8415b8
date added to LUP
2016-09-18 12:27:21
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:34:04
@article{88cdfaa4-83c9-4ef2-bed0-22424b8415b8,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies in the Western population, and a considerable proportion of colorectal carcinomas are estimated to have a familial background.</p><p>METHODS: Individuals whose mothers were diagnosed with colon carcinoma or rectal carcinoma from 1958 to 1993, a total of 1. 48 million person-years, constituted the cohort of this Swedish population-based register study. The children were born during the period 1941-1993, and the cancer incidence was observed during the period 1961-1993, with the expected national Swedish incidence used as a reference.</p><p>RESULTS: A significantly increased risk of colon carcinoma, rectal carcinoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma was observed in the cohort. The cancer risk was more pronounced in children whose mothers were age &lt; 50 years at the time of diagnosis or had developed metachronous colorectal carcinoma. Whereas colon carcinoma in the proband implied an increased risk for both colon tumors and rectal tumors, the offspring of women who were diagnosed with rectal carcinoma were at increased risk of developing rectal carcinoma, but no significantly altered risk of colon carcinoma was observed. In the cohort, the cumulative risk for colorectal carcinoma before age 50 years was increased about 3.0 times compared with the general population.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: This report shows a significant familial aggregation of colorectal carcinoma, demonstrates possible differences in hereditary pattern between colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma, and confirms that younger age at the time of diagnosis or the occurrence of metachronous tumors indicate familial carcinoma.</p>},
  author       = {Planck, M and Anderson, H and Bladström, A and Möller, Torgil and Wenngren, E and Olsson, Håkan},
  issn         = {0008-543X},
  keyword      = {Cohort Studies,Colonic Neoplasms,Colorectal Neoplasms,Female,Humans,Incidence,Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin,Male,Middle Aged,Rectal Neoplasms,Registries,Risk Factors,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {9--741},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Cancer},
  title        = {Increased cancer risk in offspring of women with colorectal carcinoma : a Swedish register-based cohort study},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2000},
}