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Maternal consumption of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v affects gastrointestinal growth and function in the suckling rat.

Fåk, Frida LU ; Ahrné, Siv LU ; Molin, Göran LU and Jeppsson, Bengt (2008) In British Journal of Nutrition 100(2). p.332-338
Abstract
After birth, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract undergoes vast structural and functional adaptations to be able to digest mother's milk and later, during the weaning period, solid food. Studies on germ-free animals have shown the role of the gut microbiota for stimulating GI maturation, but which groups are involved is unclear. In the present study, we administered the probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v), in the drinking water to pregnant and lactating rat dams until their pups had reached an age of 14 d. It was found that Lp299v colonizing the mothers were also able to colonize the pups, which had an impact on their gut growth and function. The small intestine, pancreas and liver weighed more in the 14 d-old pups born... (More)
After birth, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract undergoes vast structural and functional adaptations to be able to digest mother's milk and later, during the weaning period, solid food. Studies on germ-free animals have shown the role of the gut microbiota for stimulating GI maturation, but which groups are involved is unclear. In the present study, we administered the probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v), in the drinking water to pregnant and lactating rat dams until their pups had reached an age of 14 d. It was found that Lp299v colonizing the mothers were also able to colonize the pups, which had an impact on their gut growth and function. The small intestine, pancreas and liver weighed more in the 14 d-old pups born from dams exposed to Lp299v than in the control pups from dams given only water. Furthermore, the Lp299v pups showed decreased gut permeability. Despite a heavier spleen in the Lp299v pups, as compared to the control pups, no significant increase in the acute-phase protein, haptoglobin, was found. In conclusion, the results reported here clearly show that manipulating the maternal microflora by exposing expecting mothers to a Gram-positive, probiotic bacterium prior to parturition and during lactation impacts the gut growth and function in the offspring. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Nutrition
volume
100
issue
2
pages
332 - 338
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000257952000014
  • pmid:18179726
  • scopus:52949116841
ISSN
1475-2662
DOI
10.1017/S0007114507883036
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
06dbd35d-e5d2-441b-88fb-a7cecb70907b (old id 942176)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18179726?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-01-22 15:41:24
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:48:39
@article{06dbd35d-e5d2-441b-88fb-a7cecb70907b,
  abstract     = {After birth, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract undergoes vast structural and functional adaptations to be able to digest mother's milk and later, during the weaning period, solid food. Studies on germ-free animals have shown the role of the gut microbiota for stimulating GI maturation, but which groups are involved is unclear. In the present study, we administered the probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v), in the drinking water to pregnant and lactating rat dams until their pups had reached an age of 14 d. It was found that Lp299v colonizing the mothers were also able to colonize the pups, which had an impact on their gut growth and function. The small intestine, pancreas and liver weighed more in the 14 d-old pups born from dams exposed to Lp299v than in the control pups from dams given only water. Furthermore, the Lp299v pups showed decreased gut permeability. Despite a heavier spleen in the Lp299v pups, as compared to the control pups, no significant increase in the acute-phase protein, haptoglobin, was found. In conclusion, the results reported here clearly show that manipulating the maternal microflora by exposing expecting mothers to a Gram-positive, probiotic bacterium prior to parturition and during lactation impacts the gut growth and function in the offspring.},
  author       = {Fåk, Frida and Ahrné, Siv and Molin, Göran and Jeppsson, Bengt},
  issn         = {1475-2662},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {332--338},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {British Journal of Nutrition},
  title        = {Maternal consumption of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v affects gastrointestinal growth and function in the suckling rat.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114507883036},
  volume       = {100},
  year         = {2008},
}