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Abundance of gut Prevotella at baseline and metabolic response to barley prebiotics

Sandberg, Jonna LU ; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia ; Björck, Inger LU ; Bäckhed, Fredrik and Nilsson, Anne LU (2019) In European Journal of Nutrition 58(6). p.2365-2376
Abstract

Purpose: We previously showed that short-term intervention with barley kernel bread (BKB) improved glucose tolerance. However, glucose tolerance was not improved in a subset of individuals (non-responders) who were characterized by a low Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the baseline Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio can be used to stratify metabolic responders and non-responders to barley dietary fiber (DF). Methods: Fecal samples were collected from 99 healthy humans with BMI < 28 kg/m2 between 50 and 70 years old. The abundance of fecal Prevotella and Bacteroides was quantified with 16S rRNA quantitative PCR. 33 subjects were grouped in three groups: subjects with highest... (More)

Purpose: We previously showed that short-term intervention with barley kernel bread (BKB) improved glucose tolerance. However, glucose tolerance was not improved in a subset of individuals (non-responders) who were characterized by a low Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the baseline Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio can be used to stratify metabolic responders and non-responders to barley dietary fiber (DF). Methods: Fecal samples were collected from 99 healthy humans with BMI < 28 kg/m2 between 50 and 70 years old. The abundance of fecal Prevotella and Bacteroides was quantified with 16S rRNA quantitative PCR. 33 subjects were grouped in three groups: subjects with highest Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios, “HP”, n = 12; subjects with lowest Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios, “LP”, n = 13; and subjects with high abundance of both measured bacteria, HPB, n = 8. A 3-day randomized crossover intervention with BKB and white wheat bread (control) was performed. Cardiometabolic test variables were analyzed the next day following a standardized breakfast. Results: The BKB intervention lowered the blood glucose responses to the breakfast independently of Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios (P < 0.01). However, independently of intervention, the HP group displayed an overall lower insulin response and lower IL-6 concentrations compared with the LP group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the groups HP and HPB showed lower hunger sensations compared to the LP group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Here we show that the abundance of gut Prevotella and Bacteroides at baseline did not stratify metabolic responders and non-responders to barley DF intervention. However, our results indicate the importance of gut microbiota in host metabolic regulation, further suggesting that higher Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio may be favorable. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02427555

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bacteroides, Barley, Glucose regulation, Prevention, Prevotella, Stratification
in
European Journal of Nutrition
volume
58
issue
6
pages
2365 - 2376
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:30046942
  • scopus:85050738382
ISSN
1436-6207
DOI
10.1007/s00394-018-1788-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac65af2d-5207-42ce-813f-e23dfd1a0223
date added to LUP
2018-10-01 09:02:34
date last changed
2022-06-27 21:09:35
@article{ac65af2d-5207-42ce-813f-e23dfd1a0223,
  abstract     = {{<p>Purpose: We previously showed that short-term intervention with barley kernel bread (BKB) improved glucose tolerance. However, glucose tolerance was not improved in a subset of individuals (non-responders) who were characterized by a low Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the baseline Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio can be used to stratify metabolic responders and non-responders to barley dietary fiber (DF). Methods: Fecal samples were collected from 99 healthy humans with BMI &lt; 28 kg/m<sup>2</sup> between 50 and 70 years old. The abundance of fecal Prevotella and Bacteroides was quantified with 16S rRNA quantitative PCR. 33 subjects were grouped in three groups: subjects with highest Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios, “HP”, n = 12; subjects with lowest Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios, “LP”, n = 13; and subjects with high abundance of both measured bacteria, HPB, n = 8. A 3-day randomized crossover intervention with BKB and white wheat bread (control) was performed. Cardiometabolic test variables were analyzed the next day following a standardized breakfast. Results: The BKB intervention lowered the blood glucose responses to the breakfast independently of Prevotella/Bacteroides ratios (P &lt; 0.01). However, independently of intervention, the HP group displayed an overall lower insulin response and lower IL-6 concentrations compared with the LP group (P &lt; 0.05). Furthermore, the groups HP and HPB showed lower hunger sensations compared to the LP group (P &lt; 0.05). Conclusions: Here we show that the abundance of gut Prevotella and Bacteroides at baseline did not stratify metabolic responders and non-responders to barley DF intervention. However, our results indicate the importance of gut microbiota in host metabolic regulation, further suggesting that higher Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio may be favorable. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02427555</p>}},
  author       = {{Sandberg, Jonna and Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia and Björck, Inger and Bäckhed, Fredrik and Nilsson, Anne}},
  issn         = {{1436-6207}},
  keywords     = {{Bacteroides; Barley; Glucose regulation; Prevention; Prevotella; Stratification}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{2365--2376}},
  publisher    = {{Springer}},
  series       = {{European Journal of Nutrition}},
  title        = {{Abundance of gut Prevotella at baseline and metabolic response to barley prebiotics}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-1788-9}},
  doi          = {{10.1007/s00394-018-1788-9}},
  volume       = {{58}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}