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Vegetable, fruit and potato fibres

Nyman, Margareta LU and Haskå, Lina LU (2013) p.193-207
Abstract (Swedish)
As much as one-third of the dietary fibre intake in a normal Western diet originates from fruits and vegetables. Nutritional effects of dietary fibre can to a great extent be related to the physicochemical properties of the fibre, such as composition, solubility, viscosity, water-holding capacity and molecular weight. In fruits and vegetables the structure of the cell wall matrix (tertiary structure) is also extremely important for nutritional characteristics and texture of the product. Fruits and vegetables are often processed in some way prior to consumption. During this processing the cell wall composition and also the physicochemical properties of the plant material may be changed considerably. The effects of mechanical, chemical,... (More)
As much as one-third of the dietary fibre intake in a normal Western diet originates from fruits and vegetables. Nutritional effects of dietary fibre can to a great extent be related to the physicochemical properties of the fibre, such as composition, solubility, viscosity, water-holding capacity and molecular weight. In fruits and vegetables the structure of the cell wall matrix (tertiary structure) is also extremely important for nutritional characteristics and texture of the product. Fruits and vegetables are often processed in some way prior to consumption. During this processing the cell wall composition and also the physicochemical properties of the plant material may be changed considerably. The effects of mechanical, chemical, enzymatic and thermal processing will be discussed in this chapter. (Less)
Abstract
As much as one-third of the dietary fibre intake in a normal Western diet originates from fruits and vegetables. Nutritional effects of dietary fibre can to a great extent be related to the physicochemical properties of the fibre, such as composition, solubility, viscosity, water-holding capacity and molecular weight. In fruits and vegetables the structure of the cell wall matrix (tertiary structure) is also extremely important for nutritional characteristics and texture of the product. Fruits and vegetables are often processed in some way prior to consumption. During this processing the cell wall composition and also the physicochemical properties of the plant material may be changed considerably. The effects of mechanical, chemical,... (More)
As much as one-third of the dietary fibre intake in a normal Western diet originates from fruits and vegetables. Nutritional effects of dietary fibre can to a great extent be related to the physicochemical properties of the fibre, such as composition, solubility, viscosity, water-holding capacity and molecular weight. In fruits and vegetables the structure of the cell wall matrix (tertiary structure) is also extremely important for nutritional characteristics and texture of the product. Fruits and vegetables are often processed in some way prior to consumption. During this processing the cell wall composition and also the physicochemical properties of the plant material may be changed considerably. The effects of mechanical, chemical, enzymatic and thermal processing will be discussed in this chapter. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Fibre rich and whole grain foods - Improving quality
editor
Delcour, Jan; Poutanen, Kaisa ; and
pages
193 - 207
publisher
Woodhead publishing in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
external identifiers
  • scopus:84902639391
ISBN
9780857090386
9780857095787
DOI
10.1533/9780857095787.2.193
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b31a5752-b467-485b-9a24-46853fd3f962
date added to LUP
2018-11-08 20:22:09
date last changed
2019-03-13 16:52:26
@inbook{b31a5752-b467-485b-9a24-46853fd3f962,
  abstract     = {As much as one-third of the dietary fibre intake in a normal Western diet originates from fruits and vegetables. Nutritional effects of dietary fibre can to a great extent be related to the physicochemical properties of the fibre, such as composition, solubility, viscosity, water-holding capacity and molecular weight. In fruits and vegetables the structure of the cell wall matrix (tertiary structure) is also extremely important for nutritional characteristics and texture of the product. Fruits and vegetables are often processed in some way prior to consumption. During this processing the cell wall composition and also the physicochemical properties of the plant material may be changed considerably. The effects of mechanical, chemical, enzymatic and thermal processing will be discussed in this chapter.},
  author       = {Nyman, Margareta and Haskå, Lina},
  editor       = {Delcour, Jan and Poutanen, Kaisa },
  isbn         = {9780857090386 },
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {193--207},
  publisher    = {Woodhead publishing in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition},
  title        = {Vegetable, fruit and potato fibres},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1533/9780857095787.2.193},
  year         = {2013},
}