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Effects of intervention on self-efficacy and text quality in elementary school students’ narrative writing

Grenner, Emily LU ; Johansson, Victoria LU ; van de Weijer, Joost LU and Sahlén, Birgitta LU (2020) In Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
Abstract
Aim: Self-efficacy for writing is an important motivational factor and considered to predict writing performance. Self-efficacy for narrative writing has been sparsely studied, and few studies focus on the effects of writing intervention on self-efficacy. Additionally, there is a lack of validated measures of self-efficacy for elementary school students. In a previous study, we found that a trained panel rated personal narrative text quality higher for girls than for boys, which led to our aim: to investigate boys’ and girls’ self-efficacy for narrative writing before and after an intervention, and to explore associations between self-efficacy and text quality.
Method: An 18-item self-efficacy scale was developed. Fifty-five... (More)
Aim: Self-efficacy for writing is an important motivational factor and considered to predict writing performance. Self-efficacy for narrative writing has been sparsely studied, and few studies focus on the effects of writing intervention on self-efficacy. Additionally, there is a lack of validated measures of self-efficacy for elementary school students. In a previous study, we found that a trained panel rated personal narrative text quality higher for girls than for boys, which led to our aim: to investigate boys’ and girls’ self-efficacy for narrative writing before and after an intervention, and to explore associations between self-efficacy and text quality.
Method: An 18-item self-efficacy scale was developed. Fifty-five fifth-grade students (M 11:2 years, SD 3.7 months) filled out the scale before and after a five-lesson observational learning intervention. Self-efficacy was then related to writing performance as measured by holistic text quality ratings.
Results: Self-efficacy was strong and increased significantly post-intervention. There were moderate correlations between self-efficacy and writing performance pre- and post-intervention. Further, self-efficacy scores were considerably higher than text quality ratings. Girls and boys demonstrated similar self-efficacy, despite girls’ higher text quality.
Conclusion: The results support previous findings of strong self-efficacy at this age. The interaction between writing self-efficacy and performance is complex. Young students may not be able to differentiate between self-efficacy, general skills, task performance, perceived effort and self-regulation. Self-efficacy scales should thus be carefully constructed with respect to validity, genre, school grade, instruction and to students’ general educational context.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85077899328
ISSN
1401-5439
DOI
10.1080/14015439.2019.1709539
project
Keystroke logging and peer observation – new tools for childrens' text writing
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf0ed64f-e46e-4698-b557-3fe289787a4f
date added to LUP
2019-10-02 18:17:41
date last changed
2020-02-09 06:52:07
@article{bf0ed64f-e46e-4698-b557-3fe289787a4f,
  abstract     = {Aim: Self-efficacy for writing is an important motivational factor and considered to predict writing performance. Self-efficacy for narrative writing has been sparsely studied, and few studies focus on the effects of writing intervention on self-efficacy. Additionally, there is a lack of validated measures of self-efficacy for elementary school students. In a previous study, we found that a trained panel rated personal narrative text quality higher for girls than for boys, which led to our aim: to investigate boys’ and girls’ self-efficacy for narrative writing before and after an intervention, and to explore associations between self-efficacy and text quality. <br/>Method: An 18-item self-efficacy scale was developed. Fifty-five fifth-grade students (M 11:2 years, SD 3.7 months) filled out the scale before and after a five-lesson observational learning intervention. Self-efficacy was then related to writing performance as measured by holistic text quality ratings. <br/>Results: Self-efficacy was strong and increased significantly post-intervention. There were moderate correlations between self-efficacy and writing performance pre- and post-intervention. Further, self-efficacy scores were considerably higher than text quality ratings. Girls and boys demonstrated similar self-efficacy, despite girls’ higher text quality. <br/>Conclusion: The results support previous findings of strong self-efficacy at this age. The interaction between writing self-efficacy and performance is complex. Young students may not be able to differentiate between self-efficacy, general skills, task performance, perceived effort and self-regulation. Self-efficacy scales should thus be carefully constructed with respect to validity, genre, school grade, instruction and to students’ general educational context.<br/>},
  author       = {Grenner, Emily and Johansson, Victoria and van de Weijer, Joost and Sahlén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1401-5439},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology},
  title        = {Effects of intervention on self-efficacy and text quality in elementary school students’ narrative writing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015439.2019.1709539},
  doi          = {10.1080/14015439.2019.1709539},
  year         = {2020},
}