Advanced

Cognitive function in stroke survivors : A 10-year follow-up study

Delavaran, H LU ; Jönsson, A-C LU ; Lövkvist, H LU ; Iwarsson, S LU ; Elmståhl, S LU ; Norrving, B LU and Lindgren, Arne LU (2017) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 136(3). p.187-194
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) has considerable impact on patients and society. However, long-term studies on PSCI are scarce and may be influenced by assessment methods and selection bias. We aimed to (i) assess the prevalence of long-term PSCI; (ii) compare two common cognitive assessment instruments; and (iii) compare cognitive function of long-term stroke survivors with non-stroke persons.

METHODS: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) were administered to 10-year survivors from a population-based cohort of first-ever stroke patients included in the Lund Stroke Register, Sweden, in 2001-2002. PSCI was defined as MMSE<27 and/or MoCA<25 and severe cognitive... (More)

OBJECTIVES: Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) has considerable impact on patients and society. However, long-term studies on PSCI are scarce and may be influenced by assessment methods and selection bias. We aimed to (i) assess the prevalence of long-term PSCI; (ii) compare two common cognitive assessment instruments; and (iii) compare cognitive function of long-term stroke survivors with non-stroke persons.

METHODS: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) were administered to 10-year survivors from a population-based cohort of first-ever stroke patients included in the Lund Stroke Register, Sweden, in 2001-2002. PSCI was defined as MMSE<27 and/or MoCA<25 and severe cognitive impairment as MMSE<23. Age- and sex-matched non-stroke control subjects who had performed MMSE (but not MoCA) were recruited from the longitudinal population study "Good Ageing in Skåne." The odds of having cognitive impairment for stroke survivors compared to controls were examined with logistic regression analyses adjusting for education.

RESULTS: Of 145 stroke survivors after 10 years, 127 participated. MMSE showed PSCI in 46%, whereas MoCA displayed PSCI in 61%. Among the stroke survivors with MoCA<25, 35% had MMSE≥27 (P<.001). The odds of having severe cognitive impairment defined as MMSE<23 were higher among the stroke survivors compared to 354 controls (education-adjusted; OR=2.5; P=.004).

CONCLUSIONS: Post-stroke cognitive impairment was prevalent among 10-year stroke survivors, and the odds of having severe cognitive impairment were higher among the stroke survivors compared to non-stroke persons. The burden of long-term PSCI might have been underestimated previously, and MoCA may be more suitable than MMSE to detect long-term PSCI.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
volume
136
issue
3
pages
187 - 194
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:84996565288
  • wos:000409132400002
ISSN
1600-0404
DOI
10.1111/ane.12709
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eedf3279-9663-487b-b4ac-b81bdabc30a3
date added to LUP
2017-01-27 14:43:10
date last changed
2018-05-06 04:30:13
@article{eedf3279-9663-487b-b4ac-b81bdabc30a3,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) has considerable impact on patients and society. However, long-term studies on PSCI are scarce and may be influenced by assessment methods and selection bias. We aimed to (i) assess the prevalence of long-term PSCI; (ii) compare two common cognitive assessment instruments; and (iii) compare cognitive function of long-term stroke survivors with non-stroke persons.</p><p>METHODS: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) were administered to 10-year survivors from a population-based cohort of first-ever stroke patients included in the Lund Stroke Register, Sweden, in 2001-2002. PSCI was defined as MMSE&lt;27 and/or MoCA&lt;25 and severe cognitive impairment as MMSE&lt;23. Age- and sex-matched non-stroke control subjects who had performed MMSE (but not MoCA) were recruited from the longitudinal population study "Good Ageing in Skåne." The odds of having cognitive impairment for stroke survivors compared to controls were examined with logistic regression analyses adjusting for education.</p><p>RESULTS: Of 145 stroke survivors after 10 years, 127 participated. MMSE showed PSCI in 46%, whereas MoCA displayed PSCI in 61%. Among the stroke survivors with MoCA&lt;25, 35% had MMSE≥27 (P&lt;.001). The odds of having severe cognitive impairment defined as MMSE&lt;23 were higher among the stroke survivors compared to 354 controls (education-adjusted; OR=2.5; P=.004).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Post-stroke cognitive impairment was prevalent among 10-year stroke survivors, and the odds of having severe cognitive impairment were higher among the stroke survivors compared to non-stroke persons. The burden of long-term PSCI might have been underestimated previously, and MoCA may be more suitable than MMSE to detect long-term PSCI.</p>},
  author       = {Delavaran, H and Jönsson, A-C and Lövkvist, H and Iwarsson, S and Elmståhl, S and Norrving, B and Lindgren, Arne},
  issn         = {1600-0404},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {187--194},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Cognitive function in stroke survivors : A 10-year follow-up study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12709},
  volume       = {136},
  year         = {2017},
}