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Characterization of the Microbiota of Quinoa and Amaranth Grains, and Production of Fermented Quinoa Milk

Janny, Rownoke Jannat LU (2017) KLGM01 20161
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Abstract
The development and consumption of functional food are increasing. To meet such an increasing demand, vegetable milk extracted from quinoa and fermented with lactic acid bacteria can offer an excellent alternative to fermented dairy milk which has a high nutritive value and is free from lactose, gluten and cholesterol. This research aims at: (a) isolating and identifying the autochthonous microbiota from amaranth and quinoa grains, and (b) developing a method for producing fermented quinoa milk, using as a matrix red and white quinoa grains by lactic acid bacteria originated from quinoa grain. To meet the first objective, one amaranth and five types of quinoa grain were used for isolation of bacteria. And for the second objective, red and... (More)
The development and consumption of functional food are increasing. To meet such an increasing demand, vegetable milk extracted from quinoa and fermented with lactic acid bacteria can offer an excellent alternative to fermented dairy milk which has a high nutritive value and is free from lactose, gluten and cholesterol. This research aims at: (a) isolating and identifying the autochthonous microbiota from amaranth and quinoa grains, and (b) developing a method for producing fermented quinoa milk, using as a matrix red and white quinoa grains by lactic acid bacteria originated from quinoa grain. To meet the first objective, one amaranth and five types of quinoa grain were used for isolation of bacteria. And for the second objective, red and white quinoa milk was used for fermentation. The bacteria tested for inducing the fermentation on the quinoa milk were: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Pediococcus pentosaceous. Fermented quinoa milk was stored for 28 days at 4 ºC to monitor pH, acidity and survival of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria, L. plantarum, L. penthosus, E. gallinarum, E. casseliflavus from amaranth, and E. mundtii from both amaranth and black quinoa grain were isolated. There was no statistically significant difference in the production of lactic acid between aerobic and anaerobic fermentation of quinoa milk during fermentation and storage. Decreased pH and increased acidity was observed in all types of fermented quinoa milk. During 28 days of storage, the highest (over 99 percent) survival rate was found in fermented red quinoa milk by L. plantarum. The findings confirmed that the lactic acid bacteria can be isolated from amaranth and quinoa grains. The study also strongly confirms that it is possible to develop fermented quinoa milk by lactic acid bacteria. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Fermented quinoa milk: a healthy beverage with friendly bacteria

Consumers’ demand for fermented vegetable milk has been increasing due to its health benefits. Quinoa can offer an excellent addition to a sustainable healthy diet as fermented vegetable milk. Quinoa does not only contain higher amounts of protein than other cereals, but also carbohydrates, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and fiber. It is also gluten free. There are vegetable milk options available in supermarkets, but the availability of fermented vegetable milk is scarce. This study explored the possibility for fermenting quinoa milk with probiotic bacteria.

The present study aimed at identifying native lactic acid bacteria from quinoa and amaranth, and... (More)
Fermented quinoa milk: a healthy beverage with friendly bacteria

Consumers’ demand for fermented vegetable milk has been increasing due to its health benefits. Quinoa can offer an excellent addition to a sustainable healthy diet as fermented vegetable milk. Quinoa does not only contain higher amounts of protein than other cereals, but also carbohydrates, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and fiber. It is also gluten free. There are vegetable milk options available in supermarkets, but the availability of fermented vegetable milk is scarce. This study explored the possibility for fermenting quinoa milk with probiotic bacteria.

The present study aimed at identifying native lactic acid bacteria from quinoa and amaranth, and then ferment the quinoa milk with those bacteria. The performance of different lactic acid bacteria was analyzed and compared to find the best bacteria for fermenting quinoa milk. Three consecutive experiments were performed: isolating lactic acid bacteria from quinoa and amaranth grain, fermentation of quinoa milk with those bacteria, and storage for a month to monitor the quality of the fermented quinoa milk.

The results of the study confirmed that lactic acid bacteria can be isolated from amaranth and quinoa grains. An increase of acidity was recorded in all fermented quinoa milk during fermentation, which confirmed the possibility to ferment quinoa milk by using native as well as commercial bacteria. Compared to all other bacteria examined, L. plantarum isolated from white quinoa grain proved to have the best ability to ferment red quinoa milk, as it contained the highest amount of live bacteria throughout the fermentation and storage process. Importantly, all fermented quinoa milk contained adequate amounts of bacteria to have potential health benefits.

These results on the fermentation process of quinoa milk will hopefully enable producers to fulfill the increasing demand of industries and consumers. In the near future, we hope to see healthy fermented quinoa milk as a new fermented beverage in the supermarkets worldwide. (Less)
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author
Janny, Rownoke Jannat LU
supervisor
organization
course
KLGM01 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Quinoa milk, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), autochthonous microbiota, fermentation, probiotic, food technology, livsmedelsteknologi
language
English
id
8924227
date added to LUP
2019-04-08 14:58:00
date last changed
2019-04-08 14:58:00
@misc{8924227,
  abstract     = {The development and consumption of functional food are increasing. To meet such an increasing demand, vegetable milk extracted from quinoa and fermented with lactic acid bacteria can offer an excellent alternative to fermented dairy milk which has a high nutritive value and is free from lactose, gluten and cholesterol. This research aims at: (a) isolating and identifying the autochthonous microbiota from amaranth and quinoa grains, and (b) developing a method for producing fermented quinoa milk, using as a matrix red and white quinoa grains by lactic acid bacteria originated from quinoa grain. To meet the first objective, one amaranth and five types of quinoa grain were used for isolation of bacteria. And for the second objective, red and white quinoa milk was used for fermentation. The bacteria tested for inducing the fermentation on the quinoa milk were: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Pediococcus pentosaceous. Fermented quinoa milk was stored for 28 days at 4 ºC to monitor pH, acidity and survival of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria, L. plantarum, L. penthosus, E. gallinarum, E. casseliflavus from amaranth, and E. mundtii from both amaranth and black quinoa grain were isolated. There was no statistically significant difference in the production of lactic acid between aerobic and anaerobic fermentation of quinoa milk during fermentation and storage. Decreased pH and increased acidity was observed in all types of fermented quinoa milk. During 28 days of storage, the highest (over 99 percent) survival rate was found in fermented red quinoa milk by L. plantarum. The findings confirmed that the lactic acid bacteria can be isolated from amaranth and quinoa grains. The study also strongly confirms that it is possible to develop fermented quinoa milk by lactic acid bacteria.},
  author       = {Janny, Rownoke Jannat},
  keyword      = {Quinoa milk,lactic acid bacteria (LAB),autochthonous microbiota,fermentation,probiotic,food technology,livsmedelsteknologi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Characterization of the Microbiota of Quinoa and Amaranth Grains, and Production of Fermented Quinoa Milk},
  year         = {2017},
}