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Seizure development and noradrenaline release in kindling epilepsy after noradrenergic reinnervation of the subcortically deafferented hippocampus by superior cervical ganglion or fetal locus coeruleus grafts

Kokaia, Merab LU ; Cenci Nilsson, Angela LU ; Elmer, Eskil LU ; Nilsson, Ola LU ; Kokaia, Zaal LU ; Bengzon, Johan LU ; Björklund, Anders LU and Lindvall, Olle LU (1994) In Experimental Neurology 130(2). p.351-361
Abstract
Solid pieces of fetal locus coeruleus (LC) or superior cervical ganglion (SCG) were placed into a fimbria-fornix lesion cavity in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated, noradrenaline (NA)-denervated rats. Six to 8 months later, all animals were subjected to electrical kindling stimulations in the hippocampus until they had reached the fully kindled state. Nongrafted lesioned animals showed markedly increased kindling rate which was partly attenuated by LC but not SCG grafts. In both LC- and SCG-grafted animals, dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunocytochemistry demonstrated a high density of graft-derived noradrenergic fibers in the dorsal hippocampus, whereas reinnervation of the ventral hippocampus was much more sparse. Subregional distribution of these... (More)
Solid pieces of fetal locus coeruleus (LC) or superior cervical ganglion (SCG) were placed into a fimbria-fornix lesion cavity in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated, noradrenaline (NA)-denervated rats. Six to 8 months later, all animals were subjected to electrical kindling stimulations in the hippocampus until they had reached the fully kindled state. Nongrafted lesioned animals showed markedly increased kindling rate which was partly attenuated by LC but not SCG grafts. In both LC- and SCG-grafted animals, dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunocytochemistry demonstrated a high density of graft-derived noradrenergic fibers in the dorsal hippocampus, whereas reinnervation of the ventral hippocampus was much more sparse. Subregional distribution of these fibers within the hippocampus was different in the two grafted groups. Both grafts partly restored basal extracellular NA levels in the hippocampus and reacted to generalized seizures by a significant (two- to threefold) increase of NA release, as measured by intracerebral microdialysis. Our data indicate (i) that seizure activity can regulate transmitter release from noradrenergic neurons in both LC and SCG grafts, (ii) that only fetal LC grafts retard seizure development in kindling, and (iii) that the inability of SCG implants to influence kindling epileptogenesis could be due to a lack of synaptic contacts between the graft-derived ganglionic fibers and host hippocampal neurons. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Experimental Neurology
volume
130
issue
2
pages
351 - 361
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:7867765
  • scopus:0028630739
ISSN
0014-4886
DOI
10.1006/exnr.1994.1214
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac91bd3a-1c8c-44a5-a940-945ce8db5f60 (old id 1107865)
date added to LUP
2008-07-23 09:05:27
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:09:03
@article{ac91bd3a-1c8c-44a5-a940-945ce8db5f60,
  abstract     = {Solid pieces of fetal locus coeruleus (LC) or superior cervical ganglion (SCG) were placed into a fimbria-fornix lesion cavity in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated, noradrenaline (NA)-denervated rats. Six to 8 months later, all animals were subjected to electrical kindling stimulations in the hippocampus until they had reached the fully kindled state. Nongrafted lesioned animals showed markedly increased kindling rate which was partly attenuated by LC but not SCG grafts. In both LC- and SCG-grafted animals, dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunocytochemistry demonstrated a high density of graft-derived noradrenergic fibers in the dorsal hippocampus, whereas reinnervation of the ventral hippocampus was much more sparse. Subregional distribution of these fibers within the hippocampus was different in the two grafted groups. Both grafts partly restored basal extracellular NA levels in the hippocampus and reacted to generalized seizures by a significant (two- to threefold) increase of NA release, as measured by intracerebral microdialysis. Our data indicate (i) that seizure activity can regulate transmitter release from noradrenergic neurons in both LC and SCG grafts, (ii) that only fetal LC grafts retard seizure development in kindling, and (iii) that the inability of SCG implants to influence kindling epileptogenesis could be due to a lack of synaptic contacts between the graft-derived ganglionic fibers and host hippocampal neurons.},
  author       = {Kokaia, Merab and Cenci Nilsson, Angela and Elmer, Eskil and Nilsson, Ola and Kokaia, Zaal and Bengzon, Johan and Björklund, Anders and Lindvall, Olle},
  issn         = {0014-4886},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {351--361},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Experimental Neurology},
  title        = {Seizure development and noradrenaline release in kindling epilepsy after noradrenergic reinnervation of the subcortically deafferented hippocampus by superior cervical ganglion or fetal locus coeruleus grafts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/exnr.1994.1214},
  volume       = {130},
  year         = {1994},
}