Advanced

Epileptogenesis induced by rapidly recurring seizures in genetically fast- but not slow-kindling rats

Elmer, Eskil LU ; Kokaia, Merab LU ; Kokaia, Zaal LU ; McIntyre, Dan C and Lindvall, Olle LU (1998) In Brain Research 789(1). p.111-117
Abstract
A brief period of rapidly recurring hippocampal seizures can lead to the progressive development of a permanent increase of seizure susceptibility over several weeks, so-called 'delayed kindling'. We have analyzed seizure parameters critical for the induction of delayed kindling in two strains of rats characterized by fast and slow rates of traditional kindling, respectively. Forty seizures were produced during about 3 h by electrical kindling stimulations every 5 min in the ventral hippocampus. The fast rats displayed several generalized convulsions and had long periods of epileptiform activity, whereas the slow animals only exhibited brief, focal seizures. Changes in excitability were determined after 4 weeks using five test... (More)
A brief period of rapidly recurring hippocampal seizures can lead to the progressive development of a permanent increase of seizure susceptibility over several weeks, so-called 'delayed kindling'. We have analyzed seizure parameters critical for the induction of delayed kindling in two strains of rats characterized by fast and slow rates of traditional kindling, respectively. Forty seizures were produced during about 3 h by electrical kindling stimulations every 5 min in the ventral hippocampus. The fast rats displayed several generalized convulsions and had long periods of epileptiform activity, whereas the slow animals only exhibited brief, focal seizures. Changes in excitability were determined after 4 weeks using five test stimulations, and 2 weeks later by subjecting all animals to traditional hippocampal kindling. The fast rats showed clearly enhanced responsiveness at these time points, whereas no evidence of permanently increased seizure susceptibility was obtained in the slow rats. Our data indicate that the long-lasting stimulus-evoked seizures are mainly responsible for inducing delayed kindling, whereas the number of seizure events or generalized convulsions, and the total duration of epileptiform activity are less important. We hypothesize that long seizure episodes may be necessary to trigger the cascade of gene changes regulating the development of epilepsy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Rat, Kindling, Hyperexcitability, Hippocampus, Epilepsy
in
Brain Research
volume
789
issue
1
pages
111 - 117
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:9602084
  • scopus:0032489948
ISSN
1872-6240
DOI
10.1016/S0006-8993(97)01467-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
70844bf9-cac8-4698-8e92-1ac1d95ca7df (old id 1113345)
date added to LUP
2008-07-14 16:42:58
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:52:06
@article{70844bf9-cac8-4698-8e92-1ac1d95ca7df,
  abstract     = {A brief period of rapidly recurring hippocampal seizures can lead to the progressive development of a permanent increase of seizure susceptibility over several weeks, so-called 'delayed kindling'. We have analyzed seizure parameters critical for the induction of delayed kindling in two strains of rats characterized by fast and slow rates of traditional kindling, respectively. Forty seizures were produced during about 3 h by electrical kindling stimulations every 5 min in the ventral hippocampus. The fast rats displayed several generalized convulsions and had long periods of epileptiform activity, whereas the slow animals only exhibited brief, focal seizures. Changes in excitability were determined after 4 weeks using five test stimulations, and 2 weeks later by subjecting all animals to traditional hippocampal kindling. The fast rats showed clearly enhanced responsiveness at these time points, whereas no evidence of permanently increased seizure susceptibility was obtained in the slow rats. Our data indicate that the long-lasting stimulus-evoked seizures are mainly responsible for inducing delayed kindling, whereas the number of seizure events or generalized convulsions, and the total duration of epileptiform activity are less important. We hypothesize that long seizure episodes may be necessary to trigger the cascade of gene changes regulating the development of epilepsy.},
  author       = {Elmer, Eskil and Kokaia, Merab and Kokaia, Zaal and McIntyre, Dan C and Lindvall, Olle},
  issn         = {1872-6240},
  keyword      = {Rat,Kindling,Hyperexcitability,Hippocampus,Epilepsy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {111--117},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Brain Research},
  title        = {Epileptogenesis induced by rapidly recurring seizures in genetically fast- but not slow-kindling rats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0006-8993(97)01467-4},
  volume       = {789},
  year         = {1998},
}