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Determination of the glycaemic index of foods: interlaboratory study.

Wolever, T M S; Vorster, H H; Björck, Inger LU ; Brand-Miller, J; Brighenti, F; Mann, J I; Ramdath, D D; Granfeldt, Y; Holt, S and Perry, T L, et al. (2003) In European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 57(3). p.475-482
Abstract
Objective: Practical use of the glycaemic index (GI), as recommended by the FAO/WHO, requires an evaluation of the recommended method. Our purpose was to determine the magnitude and sources of variation of the GI values obtained by experienced investigators in different international centres.



Design: GI values of four centrally provided foods (instant potato, rice, spaghetti and barley) and locally obtained white bread were determined in 8-12 subjects in each of seven centres using the method recommended by FAO/WHO. Data analysis was performed centrally.



Setting: University departments of nutrition.



Healthy subjects (28 male, 40 female) were studied.



Results: The... (More)
Objective: Practical use of the glycaemic index (GI), as recommended by the FAO/WHO, requires an evaluation of the recommended method. Our purpose was to determine the magnitude and sources of variation of the GI values obtained by experienced investigators in different international centres.



Design: GI values of four centrally provided foods (instant potato, rice, spaghetti and barley) and locally obtained white bread were determined in 8-12 subjects in each of seven centres using the method recommended by FAO/WHO. Data analysis was performed centrally.



Setting: University departments of nutrition.



Healthy subjects (28 male, 40 female) were studied.



Results: The GI values of the five foods did not vary significantly in different centres nor was there a significant centre´food interaction. Within-subject variation from two centres using venous blood was twice that from five centres using capillary blood. The s.d. of centre mean GI values was reduced from 10.6 (range 6.8-12.8) to 9.0 (range 4.8-12.6) by excluding venous blood data. GI values were not significantly related to differences in method of glucose measurement or subject characteristics (age, sex, BMI, ethnicity or absolute glycaemic response). GI values for locally obtained bread were no more variable than those for centrally provided foods.



Conclusions: The GI values of foods are more precisely determined using capillary than venous blood sampling, with mean between-laboratory s.d. of approximately 9.0. Finding ways to reduce within-subject variation of glycaemic responses may be the most effective strategy to improve the precision of measurement of GI values. (Less)
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organization
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
carbohydrates, blood glucose responses, methods, diet
in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
57
issue
3
pages
475 - 482
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:12627186
  • wos:000181814800014
  • scopus:0037352265
ISSN
1476-5640
DOI
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601551
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4dbb5a25-9f81-4651-98cc-dc75a8baaace (old id 127861)
alternative location
http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v57/n3/pdf/1601551a.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 12:08:47
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2018-10-14 04:12:42
@article{4dbb5a25-9f81-4651-98cc-dc75a8baaace,
  abstract     = {Objective: Practical use of the glycaemic index (GI), as recommended by the FAO/WHO, requires an evaluation of the recommended method. Our purpose was to determine the magnitude and sources of variation of the GI values obtained by experienced investigators in different international centres.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design: GI values of four centrally provided foods (instant potato, rice, spaghetti and barley) and locally obtained white bread were determined in 8-12 subjects in each of seven centres using the method recommended by FAO/WHO. Data analysis was performed centrally.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Setting: University departments of nutrition.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Healthy subjects (28 male, 40 female) were studied.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: The GI values of the five foods did not vary significantly in different centres nor was there a significant centre´food interaction. Within-subject variation from two centres using venous blood was twice that from five centres using capillary blood. The s.d. of centre mean GI values was reduced from 10.6 (range 6.8-12.8) to 9.0 (range 4.8-12.6) by excluding venous blood data. GI values were not significantly related to differences in method of glucose measurement or subject characteristics (age, sex, BMI, ethnicity or absolute glycaemic response). GI values for locally obtained bread were no more variable than those for centrally provided foods.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: The GI values of foods are more precisely determined using capillary than venous blood sampling, with mean between-laboratory s.d. of approximately 9.0. Finding ways to reduce within-subject variation of glycaemic responses may be the most effective strategy to improve the precision of measurement of GI values.},
  author       = {Wolever, T M S and Vorster, H H and Björck, Inger and Brand-Miller, J and Brighenti, F and Mann, J I and Ramdath, D D and Granfeldt, Y and Holt, S and Perry, T L and Venter, C and Wu, Xiaomei},
  issn         = {1476-5640},
  keyword      = {carbohydrates,blood glucose responses,methods,diet},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {475--482},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Determination of the glycaemic index of foods: interlaboratory study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601551},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2003},
}