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Meat, eggs, dairy products, and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort

Pala, Valeria; Krogh, Vittorio; Berrino, Franco; Sieri, Sabina; Grioni, Sara; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim and Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise, et al. (2009) In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 90(3). p.602-612
Abstract
Background: A Western diet is associated with breast cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the relation of meat, egg, and dairy product consumption with breast cancer risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: Between 1992 and 2003, information on diet was collected from 319,826 women. Disease hazard ratios were estimated with multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Breast cancer cases (n = 7119) were observed during 8.8 y (median) of follow-up. No consistent association was found between breast cancer risk and the consumption of any of the food groups under study, when analyzed by both categorical and continuous exposure variable models. High processed meat... (More)
Background: A Western diet is associated with breast cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the relation of meat, egg, and dairy product consumption with breast cancer risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: Between 1992 and 2003, information on diet was collected from 319,826 women. Disease hazard ratios were estimated with multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Breast cancer cases (n = 7119) were observed during 8.8 y (median) of follow-up. No consistent association was found between breast cancer risk and the consumption of any of the food groups under study, when analyzed by both categorical and continuous exposure variable models. High processed meat consumption was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk in the categorical model (hazard ratio: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.20; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.07). Subgroup analyses suggested an association with butter consumption, limited to premenopausal women (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.53; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.21). Between-country heterogeneity was found for red meat (Q statistic = 18.03; P = 0.05) and was significantly explained (P = 0.023) by the proportion of meat cooked at high temperature. Conclusions: We have not consistently identified intakes of meat, eggs, or dairy products as risk factors for breast cancer. Future studies should investigate the possible role of high-temperature cooking in the relation of red meat intake with breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90:602-12. (Less)
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American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
90
issue
3
pages
602 - 612
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • wos:000269257300022
  • scopus:70349570180
ISSN
1938-3207
DOI
10.3945/ajcn.2008.27173
language
English
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yes
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9d55c911-de1d-4aaa-9904-ca57e56bf5ab (old id 1505883)
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2009-11-24 09:58:06
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2017-10-22 04:03:29
@article{9d55c911-de1d-4aaa-9904-ca57e56bf5ab,
  abstract     = {Background: A Western diet is associated with breast cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the relation of meat, egg, and dairy product consumption with breast cancer risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: Between 1992 and 2003, information on diet was collected from 319,826 women. Disease hazard ratios were estimated with multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Breast cancer cases (n = 7119) were observed during 8.8 y (median) of follow-up. No consistent association was found between breast cancer risk and the consumption of any of the food groups under study, when analyzed by both categorical and continuous exposure variable models. High processed meat consumption was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk in the categorical model (hazard ratio: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.20; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.07). Subgroup analyses suggested an association with butter consumption, limited to premenopausal women (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.53; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.21). Between-country heterogeneity was found for red meat (Q statistic = 18.03; P = 0.05) and was significantly explained (P = 0.023) by the proportion of meat cooked at high temperature. Conclusions: We have not consistently identified intakes of meat, eggs, or dairy products as risk factors for breast cancer. Future studies should investigate the possible role of high-temperature cooking in the relation of red meat intake with breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90:602-12.},
  author       = {Pala, Valeria and Krogh, Vittorio and Berrino, Franco and Sieri, Sabina and Grioni, Sara and Tjonneland, Anne and Olsen, Anja and Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre and Overvad, Kim and Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise and Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine and Romieu, Isabelle and Linseisen, Jakob and Rohrmann, Sabine and Boeing, Heiner and Steffen, Annika and Trichopoulou, Antonia and Benetou, Vassiliki and Naska, Androniki and Vineis, Paolo and Tumino, Rosario and Panico, Salvatore and Masala, Giovanna and Agnoli, Claudia and Engeset, Dagrun and Skeie, Guri and Lund, Eiliv and Ardanaz, Eva and Navarro, Carmen and Sanchez, Maria-Jose and Amiano, Pilar and Gonzalez Svatetz, Carlos Alberto and Rodriguez, Laudina and Wirfält, Elisabet and Manjer, Jonas and Lenner, Per and Hallmans, Goran and Peeters, Petra H. M. and van Gils, Carla H. and Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas and van Duijnhoven, Fraenzel J. B. and Key, Timothy J. and Spencer, Elizabeth and Bingham, Sheila and Khaw, Kay-Tee and Ferrari, Pietro and Byrnes, Graham and Rinaldi, Sabina and Norat, Teresa and Michaud, Dominique S. and Riboli, Elio},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {602--612},
  publisher    = {American Society for Clinical Nutrition},
  series       = {American Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Meat, eggs, dairy products, and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27173},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2009},
}