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The Validity of Obesity Based on Self-reported Weight and Height: Implications for Population Studies.

Nyholm, Maria; Gullberg, Bo LU ; Merlo, Juan LU ; Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina; Råstam, Lennart LU and Lindblad, Ulf LU (2007) In Obesity 15(1). p.197-208
Abstract
Objective: To validate self-reported information on weight and height in an adult population and to find a useful algorithm to assess the prevalence of obesity based on self-reported information. Research Methods and Procedures: This was a crosssectional survey consisting of 1703 participants (860 men and 843 women, 30 to 75 years old) conducted in the community of Vara, Sweden, from 2001 to 2003. Self-reported weight, height, and corresponding BMI were compared with measured data. Obesity was defined as measured BMI >= 30 kg/m(2). Information on education, self-rated health, smoking habits, and physical activity during leisure time was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Mean differences between measured and... (More)
Objective: To validate self-reported information on weight and height in an adult population and to find a useful algorithm to assess the prevalence of obesity based on self-reported information. Research Methods and Procedures: This was a crosssectional survey consisting of 1703 participants (860 men and 843 women, 30 to 75 years old) conducted in the community of Vara, Sweden, from 2001 to 2003. Self-reported weight, height, and corresponding BMI were compared with measured data. Obesity was defined as measured BMI >= 30 kg/m(2). Information on education, self-rated health, smoking habits, and physical activity during leisure time was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Mean differences between measured and self-reported weight were 1.6 kg (95% confidence interval, 1.4; 1.8) in men and 1.8 kg (1.6; 2.0) in women (measured higher), whereas corresponding differences in height were -0.3 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in men and -0.4 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in women (measured lower). Age and body size were important factors for misreporting height, weight, and BMI in both men and women. Obesity (measured) was found in 156 men (19%) and 184 women (25%) and with self-reported data in 114 men (14%) and 153 women (20%). For self-reported data, the sensitivity of obesity was 70% in men and 82% in women, and when adjusted for corrected self-reported data and age, it increased to 81 % and 90%, whereas the specificity decreased from 99% in both sexes to 97% in men and 98% in women. Discussion: The prevalence of obesity based on self-reported BMI can be estimated more accurately when using an algorithm adjusted for variables that are predictive for misreporting. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
validity, self-reported, height, weight
in
Obesity
volume
15
issue
1
pages
197 - 208
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000249605500025
  • scopus:33846887841
ISSN
1930-739X
DOI
10.1038/oby.2007.536
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a5df12c-cac8-4137-8c6b-4ef583d8c827 (old id 164869)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17228048&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-27 12:30:40
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:48:55
@article{6a5df12c-cac8-4137-8c6b-4ef583d8c827,
  abstract     = {Objective: To validate self-reported information on weight and height in an adult population and to find a useful algorithm to assess the prevalence of obesity based on self-reported information. Research Methods and Procedures: This was a crosssectional survey consisting of 1703 participants (860 men and 843 women, 30 to 75 years old) conducted in the community of Vara, Sweden, from 2001 to 2003. Self-reported weight, height, and corresponding BMI were compared with measured data. Obesity was defined as measured BMI >= 30 kg/m(2). Information on education, self-rated health, smoking habits, and physical activity during leisure time was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Mean differences between measured and self-reported weight were 1.6 kg (95% confidence interval, 1.4; 1.8) in men and 1.8 kg (1.6; 2.0) in women (measured higher), whereas corresponding differences in height were -0.3 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in men and -0.4 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in women (measured lower). Age and body size were important factors for misreporting height, weight, and BMI in both men and women. Obesity (measured) was found in 156 men (19%) and 184 women (25%) and with self-reported data in 114 men (14%) and 153 women (20%). For self-reported data, the sensitivity of obesity was 70% in men and 82% in women, and when adjusted for corrected self-reported data and age, it increased to 81 % and 90%, whereas the specificity decreased from 99% in both sexes to 97% in men and 98% in women. Discussion: The prevalence of obesity based on self-reported BMI can be estimated more accurately when using an algorithm adjusted for variables that are predictive for misreporting.},
  author       = {Nyholm, Maria and Gullberg, Bo and Merlo, Juan and Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina and Råstam, Lennart and Lindblad, Ulf},
  issn         = {1930-739X},
  keyword      = {validity,self-reported,height,weight},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {197--208},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Obesity},
  title        = {The Validity of Obesity Based on Self-reported Weight and Height: Implications for Population Studies.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.536},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2007},
}