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A low glycaemic diet improves oral glucose tolerance but has no effect on β-cell function in C57BL/6J mice.

Axling, Ulrika LU ; Rosén, Liza LU ; Wierup, Nils LU ; Östman, Elin LU ; Björck, Inger LU and Holm, Cecilia LU (2010) In Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 12(11). p.976-982
Abstract
AIM: Clinical studies have suggested a role for dietary glycaemic index (GI) in body weight regulation and diabetes risk. Here, we investigated the long-term metabolic effects of low and high glycaemic diets using the C57BL/6J mouse model. METHODS: Female C57BL/6J mice were fed low or high glycaemic starch in either low-fat or medium-fat diets for 22 weeks. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed to investigate the effect of the experimental diets on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. RESULTS: In this study, a high glycaemic diet resulted in impaired oral glucose tolerance compared to a low glycaemic diet. This effect was more pronounced in the group fed a medium-fat diet, suggesting that a lower dietary fat... (More)
AIM: Clinical studies have suggested a role for dietary glycaemic index (GI) in body weight regulation and diabetes risk. Here, we investigated the long-term metabolic effects of low and high glycaemic diets using the C57BL/6J mouse model. METHODS: Female C57BL/6J mice were fed low or high glycaemic starch in either low-fat or medium-fat diets for 22 weeks. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed to investigate the effect of the experimental diets on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. RESULTS: In this study, a high glycaemic diet resulted in impaired oral glucose tolerance compared to a low glycaemic diet. This effect was more pronounced in the group fed a medium-fat diet, suggesting that a lower dietary fat content ameliorates the negative effect of a high glycaemic diet. No effect on body weight or body fat content was observed in either a low-fat diet or a medium-fat diet. Static incubation of isolated islets did not show any differences in basal (3.3 mM glucose) or glucose-stimulated (8.6 and 16.7 mM glucose) insulin secretion between mice fed a low or high glycaemic diet. CONCLUSION: Together, our data suggest that the impaired glucose tolerance seen after a high glycaemic diet is not explained by altered β-cell function. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
body composition, beta-cell, glycaemic control
in
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
volume
12
issue
11
pages
976 - 982
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000282377100006
  • pmid:20880344
  • scopus:77957272603
ISSN
1462-8902
DOI
10.1111/j.1463-1326.2010.01288.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
249fb951-2ac0-4ed2-899a-b83aeabf8c07 (old id 1711613)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20880344?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-11-03 16:15:20
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:06:10
@article{249fb951-2ac0-4ed2-899a-b83aeabf8c07,
  abstract     = {AIM: Clinical studies have suggested a role for dietary glycaemic index (GI) in body weight regulation and diabetes risk. Here, we investigated the long-term metabolic effects of low and high glycaemic diets using the C57BL/6J mouse model. METHODS: Female C57BL/6J mice were fed low or high glycaemic starch in either low-fat or medium-fat diets for 22 weeks. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed to investigate the effect of the experimental diets on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. RESULTS: In this study, a high glycaemic diet resulted in impaired oral glucose tolerance compared to a low glycaemic diet. This effect was more pronounced in the group fed a medium-fat diet, suggesting that a lower dietary fat content ameliorates the negative effect of a high glycaemic diet. No effect on body weight or body fat content was observed in either a low-fat diet or a medium-fat diet. Static incubation of isolated islets did not show any differences in basal (3.3 mM glucose) or glucose-stimulated (8.6 and 16.7 mM glucose) insulin secretion between mice fed a low or high glycaemic diet. CONCLUSION: Together, our data suggest that the impaired glucose tolerance seen after a high glycaemic diet is not explained by altered β-cell function.},
  author       = {Axling, Ulrika and Rosén, Liza and Wierup, Nils and Östman, Elin and Björck, Inger and Holm, Cecilia},
  issn         = {1462-8902},
  keyword      = {body composition,beta-cell,glycaemic control},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {976--982},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism},
  title        = {A low glycaemic diet improves oral glucose tolerance but has no effect on β-cell function in C57BL/6J mice.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-1326.2010.01288.x},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2010},
}