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Physical activity and joint function in adults with severe haemophilia on long-term prophylaxis.

Khawaji, Mohamed; Astermark, Jan LU ; Åkesson, Kristina LU and Berntorp, Erik LU (2011) In Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 22(1). p.50-55
Abstract
It has been shown that patients with severe haemophilia treated on demand are not as physically active as their healthy peers and often have a sedentary lifestyle that contributes to chronic joint disease. The use of prophylaxis provides opportunities for participation in physical activities with fewer bleeding episodes. The objective of the study was to describe the type, intensity and duration of physical activity among adult patients with severe haemophilia and to find out whether a joint function dependency exists. Patients with severe haemophilia, divided into two groups (group A: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of ≤3 years and group B: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of >3 years), and 190 controls were... (More)
It has been shown that patients with severe haemophilia treated on demand are not as physically active as their healthy peers and often have a sedentary lifestyle that contributes to chronic joint disease. The use of prophylaxis provides opportunities for participation in physical activities with fewer bleeding episodes. The objective of the study was to describe the type, intensity and duration of physical activity among adult patients with severe haemophilia and to find out whether a joint function dependency exists. Patients with severe haemophilia, divided into two groups (group A: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of ≤3 years and group B: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of >3 years), and 190 controls were included. Physical activity was assessed using the self-report Modifiable Activity Questionnaire. Time involved and intensity of all aspects of physical activity for group A were almost similar to their healthy peers. Group B had significantly lower vigorous, leisure and total physical activities than group A and their healthy peers. Positive significant correlations were found between leisure and total physical activities and joint score in group A, whereas in group B, there was negative significant correlation between only nonweight-bearing activity and joint score. The early start of long-term, primary prophylaxis has been successful in reducing frequency of bleeds and thereby preventing or delaying subsequent chronic joint disease, and enables the patients to lead a physically normal life also during adulthood when patients with haemophilia treated on demand are expected to have substantial joint disease impacting their physical activity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
volume
22
issue
1
pages
50 - 55
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000285544300009
  • pmid:21119510
  • scopus:78650777718
ISSN
1473-5733
DOI
10.1097/MBC.0b013e32834128c6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
45cb3f79-7703-4824-af17-1426817b120e (old id 1756899)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21119510?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-01-03 11:55:59
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:47:48
@article{45cb3f79-7703-4824-af17-1426817b120e,
  abstract     = {It has been shown that patients with severe haemophilia treated on demand are not as physically active as their healthy peers and often have a sedentary lifestyle that contributes to chronic joint disease. The use of prophylaxis provides opportunities for participation in physical activities with fewer bleeding episodes. The objective of the study was to describe the type, intensity and duration of physical activity among adult patients with severe haemophilia and to find out whether a joint function dependency exists. Patients with severe haemophilia, divided into two groups (group A: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of ≤3 years and group B: patients who started prophylaxis at the age of >3 years), and 190 controls were included. Physical activity was assessed using the self-report Modifiable Activity Questionnaire. Time involved and intensity of all aspects of physical activity for group A were almost similar to their healthy peers. Group B had significantly lower vigorous, leisure and total physical activities than group A and their healthy peers. Positive significant correlations were found between leisure and total physical activities and joint score in group A, whereas in group B, there was negative significant correlation between only nonweight-bearing activity and joint score. The early start of long-term, primary prophylaxis has been successful in reducing frequency of bleeds and thereby preventing or delaying subsequent chronic joint disease, and enables the patients to lead a physically normal life also during adulthood when patients with haemophilia treated on demand are expected to have substantial joint disease impacting their physical activity.},
  author       = {Khawaji, Mohamed and Astermark, Jan and Åkesson, Kristina and Berntorp, Erik},
  issn         = {1473-5733},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {50--55},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis},
  title        = {Physical activity and joint function in adults with severe haemophilia on long-term prophylaxis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MBC.0b013e32834128c6},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2011},
}