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Effects on cognitive performance of modulating the postprandial blood glucose profile at breakfast.

Nilsson, Anne LU ; Radeborg, Karl LU and Björck, Inger LU (2012) In European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 66(9). p.1039-1043
Abstract
Background/Objectives:Considering the importance of glucose as a brain substrate, the postprandial rate of glucose delivery to the blood could be expected to affect cognitive functions. The purpose was to evaluate to what extent the rate of glucose absorption affected measures of cognitive performance in the postprandial period. In addition, cognitive performance was evaluated in relation to individual glucoregulation.Subjects/Methods:A white wheat bread (WWB) enriched with guar gum (G-WWB) with the capacity to produce a low but sustained blood glucose net increment was developed. The G-WWB was evaluated in the postprandial period after breakfast with respect to effects on cognitive function (working memory and selective attention (SA)) in... (More)
Background/Objectives:Considering the importance of glucose as a brain substrate, the postprandial rate of glucose delivery to the blood could be expected to affect cognitive functions. The purpose was to evaluate to what extent the rate of glucose absorption affected measures of cognitive performance in the postprandial period. In addition, cognitive performance was evaluated in relation to individual glucoregulation.Subjects/Methods:A white wheat bread (WWB) enriched with guar gum (G-WWB) with the capacity to produce a low but sustained blood glucose net increment was developed. The G-WWB was evaluated in the postprandial period after breakfast with respect to effects on cognitive function (working memory and selective attention (SA)) in 40 healthy adults (49-71 years, body mass index 20-29 kg/m(2)), using a high glycaemic index WWB for comparison in a randomised crossover design.Results:The G-WWB improved outcome in the cognitive tests (SA test) in the later postprandial period (75-225 min) in comparison with the WWB (P<0.01). Subjects with better glucoregulation performed superior in cognitive tests compared with subjects with worse glucoregulation (P<0.05).Conclusions:Beneficial effects on cognitive performance were observed with the G-WWB in the late postprandial period. The positive effect is suggested to emanate from improved insulin sensitivity, possibly in a combination with an enhanced neural energy supply. The results highlight the importance of carbohydrate foods that induces a low but sustained blood glucose profile in enhancing postprandial cognitive functions.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 11 July 2012; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.80. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
66
issue
9
pages
1039 - 1043
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000308342600015
  • pmid:22781020
  • scopus:84865984496
ISSN
1476-5640
DOI
10.1038/ejcn.2012.80
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fc03d94b-8c25-4d34-b371-bec9f310c053 (old id 2967286)
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 11:41:11
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:49:59
@article{fc03d94b-8c25-4d34-b371-bec9f310c053,
  abstract     = {Background/Objectives:Considering the importance of glucose as a brain substrate, the postprandial rate of glucose delivery to the blood could be expected to affect cognitive functions. The purpose was to evaluate to what extent the rate of glucose absorption affected measures of cognitive performance in the postprandial period. In addition, cognitive performance was evaluated in relation to individual glucoregulation.Subjects/Methods:A white wheat bread (WWB) enriched with guar gum (G-WWB) with the capacity to produce a low but sustained blood glucose net increment was developed. The G-WWB was evaluated in the postprandial period after breakfast with respect to effects on cognitive function (working memory and selective attention (SA)) in 40 healthy adults (49-71 years, body mass index 20-29 kg/m(2)), using a high glycaemic index WWB for comparison in a randomised crossover design.Results:The G-WWB improved outcome in the cognitive tests (SA test) in the later postprandial period (75-225 min) in comparison with the WWB (P&lt;0.01). Subjects with better glucoregulation performed superior in cognitive tests compared with subjects with worse glucoregulation (P&lt;0.05).Conclusions:Beneficial effects on cognitive performance were observed with the G-WWB in the late postprandial period. The positive effect is suggested to emanate from improved insulin sensitivity, possibly in a combination with an enhanced neural energy supply. The results highlight the importance of carbohydrate foods that induces a low but sustained blood glucose profile in enhancing postprandial cognitive functions.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 11 July 2012; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.80.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Anne and Radeborg, Karl and Björck, Inger},
  issn         = {1476-5640},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1039--1043},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Effects on cognitive performance of modulating the postprandial blood glucose profile at breakfast.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.80},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2012},
}