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Measures of birth size in relation to risk of prostate cancer: the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study, Sweden

Lahmann, P. H.; Wallström, Peter LU ; Lissner, L.; Olsson, Håkan LU and Gullberg, Bo LU (2012) In Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 3(6). p.442-449
Abstract
There is some evidence that perinatal factors, specifically birth weight (BW), may be related to the onset of prostate cancer (PRCA). This case-control study, nested within the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study, used archived birth record data from 308 incident PRCA cases diagnosed between 1991 and 2005, and 637 age-matched controls among 4781 men born (1923-1945) in Malmo and Lund, Sweden. We applied conditional logistic regression to examine the birth size-PRCA association, including tumour subtypes, adjusting for perinatal and adult factors. Compared with controls, cases had a non-significantly higher mean BW and were more likely to have high (> 4000 g) BW (21% v. 18%), but did not differ in other birth size measures, nor in mean... (More)
There is some evidence that perinatal factors, specifically birth weight (BW), may be related to the onset of prostate cancer (PRCA). This case-control study, nested within the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study, used archived birth record data from 308 incident PRCA cases diagnosed between 1991 and 2005, and 637 age-matched controls among 4781 men born (1923-1945) in Malmo and Lund, Sweden. We applied conditional logistic regression to examine the birth size-PRCA association, including tumour subtypes, adjusting for perinatal and adult factors. Compared with controls, cases had a non-significantly higher mean BW and were more likely to have high (> 4000 g) BW (21% v. 18%), but did not differ in other birth size measures, nor in mean adult body mass index. We observed a non-linear association between BW and PRCA risk. Compared with BWs between 3000 and 3500 g (reference), the fully adjusted odds ratios (OR, 95% CI) were 0.55 (0.33-0.91) for < 3000 g, 0.86 (0.61-1.22) for 3500-4000 g and 0.98 (0.64-1.50) for > 4000 g. Among men with aggressive tumours, the reduction in risk for those with BWs < 3000 g (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.72) was stronger than the rate of risk for PRCA overall. Crude risk estimates were minimally attenuated when adjusted for gestational age, maternal age, birth order and adult factors. Birth length, head circumference and placental weight were not associated with prostate cancer. Our results indicate a protective effect of lower BW on risk of total and aggressive prostate cancer, rather than any direct effect of larger birth size. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
birth length, birth weight, gestational age, perinatal factors, prostate, cancer
in
Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
volume
3
issue
6
pages
442 - 449
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000311685700006
  • scopus:84943366930
ISSN
2040-1752
DOI
10.1017/S2040174412000402
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ec359986-09e0-4a87-823b-b5d897d52cfe (old id 3372713)
date added to LUP
2013-02-01 07:00:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:54:12
@article{ec359986-09e0-4a87-823b-b5d897d52cfe,
  abstract     = {There is some evidence that perinatal factors, specifically birth weight (BW), may be related to the onset of prostate cancer (PRCA). This case-control study, nested within the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study, used archived birth record data from 308 incident PRCA cases diagnosed between 1991 and 2005, and 637 age-matched controls among 4781 men born (1923-1945) in Malmo and Lund, Sweden. We applied conditional logistic regression to examine the birth size-PRCA association, including tumour subtypes, adjusting for perinatal and adult factors. Compared with controls, cases had a non-significantly higher mean BW and were more likely to have high (&gt; 4000 g) BW (21% v. 18%), but did not differ in other birth size measures, nor in mean adult body mass index. We observed a non-linear association between BW and PRCA risk. Compared with BWs between 3000 and 3500 g (reference), the fully adjusted odds ratios (OR, 95% CI) were 0.55 (0.33-0.91) for &lt; 3000 g, 0.86 (0.61-1.22) for 3500-4000 g and 0.98 (0.64-1.50) for &gt; 4000 g. Among men with aggressive tumours, the reduction in risk for those with BWs &lt; 3000 g (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.72) was stronger than the rate of risk for PRCA overall. Crude risk estimates were minimally attenuated when adjusted for gestational age, maternal age, birth order and adult factors. Birth length, head circumference and placental weight were not associated with prostate cancer. Our results indicate a protective effect of lower BW on risk of total and aggressive prostate cancer, rather than any direct effect of larger birth size.},
  author       = {Lahmann, P. H. and Wallström, Peter and Lissner, L. and Olsson, Håkan and Gullberg, Bo},
  issn         = {2040-1752},
  keyword      = {birth length,birth weight,gestational age,perinatal factors,prostate,cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {442--449},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease},
  title        = {Measures of birth size in relation to risk of prostate cancer: the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S2040174412000402},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2012},
}