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Impact of protein surface coverage and layer thickness on rehydration characteristics of milk serum protein/lactose powder particles

Andersson, I. M. LU ; Millqvist-Fureby, A.; Sommertune, J.; Alexander, M.; Hellström, N.; Glantz, M. LU ; Paulsson, M. LU and Bergenståhl, B. LU (2019) In Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 561. p.395-404
Abstract

Spray-dried powders were produced from milk serum protein concentrate and lactose in varying ratios, and the rehydration characteristics of the powders were evaluated. The dissolution rate was estimated with a flow-cell based technique, and the external and internal distribution of the powder components were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, respectively. The surface of the powder particles is more or less covered by a thin protein layer. A phase segregation between protein and lactose is observed in the interior of the particle resulting in a protein rich layer in the vicinity of the surface. However, the protein layer in the vicinity of the particle surface tends to become thinner as the... (More)

Spray-dried powders were produced from milk serum protein concentrate and lactose in varying ratios, and the rehydration characteristics of the powders were evaluated. The dissolution rate was estimated with a flow-cell based technique, and the external and internal distribution of the powder components were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, respectively. The surface of the powder particles is more or less covered by a thin protein layer. A phase segregation between protein and lactose is observed in the interior of the particle resulting in a protein rich layer in the vicinity of the surface. However, the protein layer in the vicinity of the particle surface tends to become thinner as the bulk protein concentration increases in the powders (from 10 to 60% w/w). The time for the spontaneous imbibition to occur show a linear correlation with the protein surface coverage. The dissolution rate of powders containing 0.1% w/w protein is around 60 times faster than for a powder containing 1% w/w protein but the dissolution rate of powders containing 1% and 100% w/w differ only by a factor of 2. Thus, it is suggested that the outer protein layer becomes denser at the interface as the protein content increases in the powders, thereby causing poorer rehydration characteristics of the powders (especially for low protein concentrations 0.1–1% w/w). This insight has relevance for the formulation of whey protein powders with improved rehydration characteristics.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Confocal raman microscopy, Lactose, Milk serum protein, Phase segregation, Rehydration, Spray drying
in
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects
volume
561
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056673089
ISSN
0927-7757
DOI
10.1016/j.colsurfa.2018.10.073
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40c18f42-a14e-494d-bd74-86badd8a07cb
date added to LUP
2018-11-26 12:08:22
date last changed
2019-01-06 14:17:19
@article{40c18f42-a14e-494d-bd74-86badd8a07cb,
  abstract     = {<p>Spray-dried powders were produced from milk serum protein concentrate and lactose in varying ratios, and the rehydration characteristics of the powders were evaluated. The dissolution rate was estimated with a flow-cell based technique, and the external and internal distribution of the powder components were evaluated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, respectively. The surface of the powder particles is more or less covered by a thin protein layer. A phase segregation between protein and lactose is observed in the interior of the particle resulting in a protein rich layer in the vicinity of the surface. However, the protein layer in the vicinity of the particle surface tends to become thinner as the bulk protein concentration increases in the powders (from 10 to 60% w/w). The time for the spontaneous imbibition to occur show a linear correlation with the protein surface coverage. The dissolution rate of powders containing 0.1% w/w protein is around 60 times faster than for a powder containing 1% w/w protein but the dissolution rate of powders containing 1% and 100% w/w differ only by a factor of 2. Thus, it is suggested that the outer protein layer becomes denser at the interface as the protein content increases in the powders, thereby causing poorer rehydration characteristics of the powders (especially for low protein concentrations 0.1–1% w/w). This insight has relevance for the formulation of whey protein powders with improved rehydration characteristics.</p>},
  author       = {Andersson, I. M. and Millqvist-Fureby, A. and Sommertune, J. and Alexander, M. and Hellström, N. and Glantz, M. and Paulsson, M. and Bergenståhl, B.},
  issn         = {0927-7757},
  keyword      = {Confocal raman microscopy,Lactose,Milk serum protein,Phase segregation,Rehydration,Spray drying},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {395--404},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects},
  title        = {Impact of protein surface coverage and layer thickness on rehydration characteristics of milk serum protein/lactose powder particles},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2018.10.073},
  volume       = {561},
  year         = {2019},
}