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Carboxylic acids in the hindgut of rats fed higly soluble inulin and Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-123), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC 500) or Lactobacillus rhamnous (GG)

Nilsson, Ulf LU and Nyman, Margareta LU (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition 51(13-21). p.13-21
Abstract
Background: Propionic and butyric acids are important nutrients for the mucosal cells and may therefore increase the nutritional status and reduce the permeability of the colonic mucosa. These acids have also been suggested to counteract diseases in the colon, e.g. ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Different substrates lead to different amounts and patterns of carboxylic acids (CAs).



Objective: To study the effect of probiotics on CA formation in the hindgut of rats given inulin.



Design: The rats were given inulin, marketed as highly soluble by the producer, together with the probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), or a... (More)
Background: Propionic and butyric acids are important nutrients for the mucosal cells and may therefore increase the nutritional status and reduce the permeability of the colonic mucosa. These acids have also been suggested to counteract diseases in the colon, e.g. ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Different substrates lead to different amounts and patterns of carboxylic acids (CAs).



Objective: To study the effect of probiotics on CA formation in the hindgut of rats given inulin.



Design: The rats were given inulin, marketed as highly soluble by the producer, together with the probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), or a mixture of all three.



Results: Rats fed inulin only had comparatively high proportions of propionic and butyric acids throughout the hindgut. When diets were supplemented with Bb-12 and UCC500, the caecal pool of CAs increased compared with inulin only. In the caecum the proportion of butyric acid generally decreased when the rats were fed probiotics. In the distal colon the proportion of propionic and butyric acid was lower, while that of lactic acid was generally higher. The caecal pH in rats fed GG and Bb-12 was lower than expected from the concentration of CAs. Further, rats fed GG had the lowest weight gain and highest caecal tissue weight.



Conclusions: It is possible to modify the formation of CAs by combining inulin with probiotics. Different probiotics had different effects. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), carboxylic acids, inulin, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500), prebiotics
in
Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition
volume
51
issue
13-21
pages
13 - 21
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:34247275674
ISSN
1748-2976
DOI
10.1080/17482970701266970
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
74d902d8-3cdf-48b0-a7f9-13873ce99ef2 (old id 757482)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 16:02:12
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:37:50
@article{74d902d8-3cdf-48b0-a7f9-13873ce99ef2,
  abstract     = {Background: Propionic and butyric acids are important nutrients for the mucosal cells and may therefore increase the nutritional status and reduce the permeability of the colonic mucosa. These acids have also been suggested to counteract diseases in the colon, e.g. ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Different substrates lead to different amounts and patterns of carboxylic acids (CAs). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objective: To study the effect of probiotics on CA formation in the hindgut of rats given inulin. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design: The rats were given inulin, marketed as highly soluble by the producer, together with the probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), or a mixture of all three. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Rats fed inulin only had comparatively high proportions of propionic and butyric acids throughout the hindgut. When diets were supplemented with Bb-12 and UCC500, the caecal pool of CAs increased compared with inulin only. In the caecum the proportion of butyric acid generally decreased when the rats were fed probiotics. In the distal colon the proportion of propionic and butyric acid was lower, while that of lactic acid was generally higher. The caecal pH in rats fed GG and Bb-12 was lower than expected from the concentration of CAs. Further, rats fed GG had the lowest weight gain and highest caecal tissue weight. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: It is possible to modify the formation of CAs by combining inulin with probiotics. Different probiotics had different effects.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Ulf and Nyman, Margareta},
  issn         = {1748-2976},
  keyword      = {Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12),carboxylic acids,inulin,Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG),Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500),prebiotics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13-21},
  pages        = {13--21},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition},
  title        = {Carboxylic acids in the hindgut of rats fed higly soluble inulin and Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-123), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC 500) or Lactobacillus rhamnous (GG)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17482970701266970},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2007},
}