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Physicochemical properties of different thickeners used in infant foods and their relationship with mineral availability during in vitro digestion process

Alberto Gonzalez-Bermudez, Carlos; Castro, Alejandra; Pérez, Daysi LU ; Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; Martinez-Gracia, Carmen and Nilsson, Lars LU (2015) In Food Research International 78. p.62-70
Abstract
Locust bean gum (LBG) and modified starches are commonly used as thickeners in food products for infants. However, there is no consensus on their possible effects on infant nutrition, especially on mineral availability. The aim of the present work was to characterize the effect of LBG, cross-linked, hydroxypropylated maize starch (Mhdp) and pre-gelatinized rice starch (gRS) on Ca, Fe and Zn availability during a gastric and intestinal in vitro digestion assay in relation to their physicochemical properties in solution (apparent viscosity, solubility, molar mass (M) and conformational properties) through the simulated digestion process. LEG gave the highest decrease in Ca and Fe gastric (17.96% and 17.6% respectively) and intestinal (19.5%... (More)
Locust bean gum (LBG) and modified starches are commonly used as thickeners in food products for infants. However, there is no consensus on their possible effects on infant nutrition, especially on mineral availability. The aim of the present work was to characterize the effect of LBG, cross-linked, hydroxypropylated maize starch (Mhdp) and pre-gelatinized rice starch (gRS) on Ca, Fe and Zn availability during a gastric and intestinal in vitro digestion assay in relation to their physicochemical properties in solution (apparent viscosity, solubility, molar mass (M) and conformational properties) through the simulated digestion process. LEG gave the highest decrease in Ca and Fe gastric (17.96% and 17.6% respectively) and intestinal (19.5% and 13.5%) solubility with respect to the reference without thickeners. Ca (11.1% +/- 1.1), Fe (2.77% +/- 0.3) and Zn (7.78% +/- 0.6) dialyzability was also lower than for the reference (23.4% +/- 2.9; 19.65% +/- 3.53 and 27.74% +/- 33 respectively). LBG solubility remained stable during gastric digestion, decreasing significantly from a range of 65-69% to 61.1% after intestinal digestion. LBG viscosity remained stable during the digestion process, being these findings attributable to its resistance to enzymes. On the other hand, the addition to Mhdp or gRS slightly affected Ca and Fe solubility or Ca dialyzability, decreasing after gastric digestion and then increasing after intestinal digestion with respect to the reference. These results correlated to the changes in their viscosity enhancing properties, which increased during gastric digestion and decreased after intestinal digestion, being attributable to their digestion by pancreatic enzymes. Gastric digestion resulted in an increase in M for the modified starches (more pronounced for gRS). The increase in mineral solubility and dialyzability after intestinal digestion with respect to the gastric stage was explained by the degradation of starches by intestinal enzymes, which resulted in a decrease in apparent shear viscosity (from 1.2 to 1 Pa s, measured in a shear rate range 0.00-50 s(-1)) and an increase in solubility (from 3 to 6% to approximately 70%) after intestinal digestion. In conclusion, LBG could be more effective than Mhdp and gRS as thickener, providing higher viscosity and resistance to digestive process. However, its negative effect on mineral solubility and dialyzability should be taken into account. On the contrary, Mhdp and gRS showed to be degraded after intestinal digestion. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Thickeners, In vitro digestion, Mineral availability, Solubility, Viscosity, Molecular properties
in
Food Research International
volume
78
pages
62 - 70
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000367774800008
  • scopus:84949199814
ISSN
0963-9969
DOI
10.1016/j.foodres.2015.11.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
03777964-7eb4-46b9-bb43-51f68d0b945b (old id 8761470)
date added to LUP
2016-02-22 14:28:53
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:24:11
@article{03777964-7eb4-46b9-bb43-51f68d0b945b,
  abstract     = {Locust bean gum (LBG) and modified starches are commonly used as thickeners in food products for infants. However, there is no consensus on their possible effects on infant nutrition, especially on mineral availability. The aim of the present work was to characterize the effect of LBG, cross-linked, hydroxypropylated maize starch (Mhdp) and pre-gelatinized rice starch (gRS) on Ca, Fe and Zn availability during a gastric and intestinal in vitro digestion assay in relation to their physicochemical properties in solution (apparent viscosity, solubility, molar mass (M) and conformational properties) through the simulated digestion process. LEG gave the highest decrease in Ca and Fe gastric (17.96% and 17.6% respectively) and intestinal (19.5% and 13.5%) solubility with respect to the reference without thickeners. Ca (11.1% +/- 1.1), Fe (2.77% +/- 0.3) and Zn (7.78% +/- 0.6) dialyzability was also lower than for the reference (23.4% +/- 2.9; 19.65% +/- 3.53 and 27.74% +/- 33 respectively). LBG solubility remained stable during gastric digestion, decreasing significantly from a range of 65-69% to 61.1% after intestinal digestion. LBG viscosity remained stable during the digestion process, being these findings attributable to its resistance to enzymes. On the other hand, the addition to Mhdp or gRS slightly affected Ca and Fe solubility or Ca dialyzability, decreasing after gastric digestion and then increasing after intestinal digestion with respect to the reference. These results correlated to the changes in their viscosity enhancing properties, which increased during gastric digestion and decreased after intestinal digestion, being attributable to their digestion by pancreatic enzymes. Gastric digestion resulted in an increase in M for the modified starches (more pronounced for gRS). The increase in mineral solubility and dialyzability after intestinal digestion with respect to the gastric stage was explained by the degradation of starches by intestinal enzymes, which resulted in a decrease in apparent shear viscosity (from 1.2 to 1 Pa s, measured in a shear rate range 0.00-50 s(-1)) and an increase in solubility (from 3 to 6% to approximately 70%) after intestinal digestion. In conclusion, LBG could be more effective than Mhdp and gRS as thickener, providing higher viscosity and resistance to digestive process. However, its negative effect on mineral solubility and dialyzability should be taken into account. On the contrary, Mhdp and gRS showed to be degraded after intestinal digestion. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Alberto Gonzalez-Bermudez, Carlos and Castro, Alejandra and Pérez, Daysi and Frontela-Saseta, Carmen and Martinez-Gracia, Carmen and Nilsson, Lars},
  issn         = {0963-9969},
  keyword      = {Thickeners,In vitro digestion,Mineral availability,Solubility,Viscosity,Molecular properties},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {62--70},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Food Research International},
  title        = {Physicochemical properties of different thickeners used in infant foods and their relationship with mineral availability during in vitro digestion process},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2015.11.006},
  volume       = {78},
  year         = {2015},
}