Advanced

Characterization of Indigestible Carbohydrates in Various Fractions from Wheat Processing

Haskå, Lina LU ; Nyman, Margareta LU and Andersson, Roger (2010) In Cereal Chemistry 87(2). p.125-130
Abstract
Fractions rich in indigestible carbohydrates, such as fructan and arabinoxylan, are obtained as by-products when ethanol, starch, and gluten are produced from wheat flour. Today, these fractions are used as animal feed. However, these components may have positive physiological effects in humans. In this study, the content of indigestible carbohydrates in distillers' grains and process streams from the wet fractionation of wheat flour was determined. The fractions were further characterized by ethanol extractability analysis, anion-exchange chromatography, NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography. One fraction from wet fractionation contained (g/100 g, db) 6.0 ± 1.0 fructan and 10.3 ± 1.1 dietary fiber (66 ± 4% arabinoxylan), while... (More)
Fractions rich in indigestible carbohydrates, such as fructan and arabinoxylan, are obtained as by-products when ethanol, starch, and gluten are produced from wheat flour. Today, these fractions are used as animal feed. However, these components may have positive physiological effects in humans. In this study, the content of indigestible carbohydrates in distillers' grains and process streams from the wet fractionation of wheat flour was determined. The fractions were further characterized by ethanol extractability analysis, anion-exchange chromatography, NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography. One fraction from wet fractionation contained (g/100 g, db) 6.0 ± 1.0 fructan and 10.3 ± 1.1 dietary fiber (66 ± 4% arabinoxylan), while distillers' grains contained 20.7 g/100 g (db) dietary fiber (30% arabinoxylan). In addition to indigestible carbohydrates from wheat, distillers' grains contained β-(1→3) and β-(1→6) glucans and mannoproteins from the yeast and low molecular weight carbohydrates mainly composed of arabinose. The use of endoxylanase in wet fractionation decreased the molecular weight of the arabinoxylans and increased the arabinose to xylose ratio but had no effect on the fructans. In conclusion, waste streams from industrial wheat processing were enriched in fructan, arabinoxylan, and other indigestible carbohydrates. However, the physiological effects of these fractions require further investigation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cereal Chemistry
volume
87
issue
2
pages
125 - 130
publisher
American Association of Cereal Chemists
external identifiers
  • wos:000282918600007
  • scopus:77950485008
ISSN
0009-0352
DOI
10.1094/CCHEM-87-2-0125
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
72cf5966-dfa2-4369-8e0e-f6ed7be6e336 (old id 934102)
date added to LUP
2008-01-25 12:20:26
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:27:58
@article{72cf5966-dfa2-4369-8e0e-f6ed7be6e336,
  abstract     = {Fractions rich in indigestible carbohydrates, such as fructan and arabinoxylan, are obtained as by-products when ethanol, starch, and gluten are produced from wheat flour. Today, these fractions are used as animal feed. However, these components may have positive physiological effects in humans. In this study, the content of indigestible carbohydrates in distillers' grains and process streams from the wet fractionation of wheat flour was determined. The fractions were further characterized by ethanol extractability analysis, anion-exchange chromatography, NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography. One fraction from wet fractionation contained (g/100 g, db) 6.0 ± 1.0 fructan and 10.3 ± 1.1 dietary fiber (66 ± 4% arabinoxylan), while distillers' grains contained 20.7 g/100 g (db) dietary fiber (30% arabinoxylan). In addition to indigestible carbohydrates from wheat, distillers' grains contained β-(1→3) and β-(1→6) glucans and mannoproteins from the yeast and low molecular weight carbohydrates mainly composed of arabinose. The use of endoxylanase in wet fractionation decreased the molecular weight of the arabinoxylans and increased the arabinose to xylose ratio but had no effect on the fructans. In conclusion, waste streams from industrial wheat processing were enriched in fructan, arabinoxylan, and other indigestible carbohydrates. However, the physiological effects of these fractions require further investigation.},
  author       = {Haskå, Lina and Nyman, Margareta and Andersson, Roger},
  issn         = {0009-0352},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {125--130},
  publisher    = {American Association of Cereal Chemists},
  series       = {Cereal Chemistry},
  title        = {Characterization of Indigestible Carbohydrates in Various Fractions from Wheat Processing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/CCHEM-87-2-0125},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2010},
}