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Mirror, peephole and video - The role of contiguity in children's perception of reference in iconic signs

Lenninger, Sara LU ; Persson, Tomas LU ; van de Weijer, Joost LU and Sonesson, Göran LU (2020) In Frontiers in Psychology 11.
Abstract
The present study looked at the extent to which 2-year-old children benefited from information conveyed by viewing a hiding event through an opening in a cardboard screen, seeing it as live video, as pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. Being encouraged to find the hidden object by selecting one out of two cups, the children successfully picked the baited cup significantly more often when they had viewed the hiding through the opening, or in live video, than when they viewed it in pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. All conditions rely on the perception of similarity. The study suggests, however, that contiguity – i.e., the perception of temporal and physical closeness between events – rather than similarity is the principal... (More)
The present study looked at the extent to which 2-year-old children benefited from information conveyed by viewing a hiding event through an opening in a cardboard screen, seeing it as live video, as pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. Being encouraged to find the hidden object by selecting one out of two cups, the children successfully picked the baited cup significantly more often when they had viewed the hiding through the opening, or in live video, than when they viewed it in pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. All conditions rely on the perception of similarity. The study suggests, however, that contiguity – i.e., the perception of temporal and physical closeness between events – rather than similarity is the principal factor accounting for the results. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
contiguity, children, sign use, indexicality, semiotic resource, visual iconic media, mirror, video
in
Frontiers in Psychology
volume
11
article number
1622
pages
14 pages
publisher
Frontiers Media S. A.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85088789909
  • pmid:32760329
ISSN
1664-1078
DOI
10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01622
project
Precursors of Sign Use in Intersubjectivity and Imitation (PSUII)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7d8f0a4-f25b-4677-a176-a4c50eaf7fca
date added to LUP
2020-06-16 09:05:32
date last changed
2020-10-14 03:00:10
@article{a7d8f0a4-f25b-4677-a176-a4c50eaf7fca,
  abstract     = {The present study looked at the extent to which 2-year-old children benefited from information conveyed by viewing a hiding event through an opening in a cardboard screen, seeing it as live video, as pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. Being encouraged to find the hidden object by selecting one out of two cups, the children successfully picked the baited cup significantly more often when they had viewed the hiding through the opening, or in live video, than when they viewed it in pre-recorded video, or by way of a mirror. All conditions rely on the perception of similarity. The study suggests, however, that contiguity – i.e., the perception of temporal and physical closeness between events – rather than similarity is the principal factor accounting for the results.},
  author       = {Lenninger, Sara and Persson, Tomas and van de Weijer, Joost and Sonesson, Göran},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {Frontiers Media S. A.},
  series       = {Frontiers in Psychology},
  title        = {Mirror, peephole and video - The role of contiguity in children's perception of reference in iconic signs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01622},
  doi          = {10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01622},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2020},
}