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Interpreting Robot Pointing Behavior

Gärdenfors, Peter LU ; Williams, Mary-Anne ; Abidi, Shaukat ; Wang, Xun ; Kuipers, Benjamin and Johnston, Benjamin (2013) In Lecture Notes in Computer Science 8239. p.148-159
Abstract
The ability to draw other agents’ attention to objects and events is an important skill on the critical path to effective human-robot collaboration. People use the act of pointing to draw other people’s attention to objects and events for a wide range of purposes. While there is significant work that aims to understand people’s pointing behavior, there is little work analyzing how people interpret robot pointing. Since robots have a wide range of physical bodies and cognitive architectures, interpreting pointing will be determined by a specific robot’s morphology and behavior. Humanoids and robots whose heads, torso and arms resemble humans that point may be easier for people to interpret, however if such robots have different perceptual... (More)
The ability to draw other agents’ attention to objects and events is an important skill on the critical path to effective human-robot collaboration. People use the act of pointing to draw other people’s attention to objects and events for a wide range of purposes. While there is significant work that aims to understand people’s pointing behavior, there is little work analyzing how people interpret robot pointing. Since robots have a wide range of physical bodies and cognitive architectures, interpreting pointing will be determined by a specific robot’s morphology and behavior. Humanoids and robots whose heads, torso and arms resemble humans that point may be easier for people to interpret, however if such robots have different perceptual capabilities to people then misinterpretation may occur. In this paper we investigate how ordinary people interpret the pointing behavior of a leading state-of-the-art service robot that has been designed to work closely with people. We tested three hypotheses about how robot pointing is interpreted. The most surprising finding was that the direction and pitch of the robot’s head was important in some conditions. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)


Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Human-robot interaction , human-robot collaboration , sociocognitive skills , attention , joint attention , pointing
host publication
Social Robotics : 5th International Conference, ICSR 2013, Bristol, UK, October 27-29, 2013, Proceedings - 5th International Conference, ICSR 2013, Bristol, UK, October 27-29, 2013, Proceedings
series title
Lecture Notes in Computer Science
editor
Herrmann, Guido ; Pearson, Martin J. ; Lenz, Alexander ; Bremner, Paul ; Spiers, Adam ; Leonards, Ute ; ; ; ; ; and
volume
8239
pages
148 - 159
external identifiers
  • scopus:84892428106
ISSN
0302-9743
1611-3349
ISBN
978-3-319-02675-6
978-3-319-02674-9
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-02675-6_15
project
Thinking in Time: Cognition, Communication and Learning
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Cite this paper as: Williams MA., Abidi S., Gärdenfors P., Wang X., Kuipers B., Johnston B. (2013) Interpreting Robot Pointing Behavior. In: Herrmann G., Pearson M.J., Lenz A., Bremner P., Spiers A., Leonards U. (eds) Social Robotics. ICSR 2013. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8239. Springer, Cham
id
f8792bce-1d18-4104-b82f-ba90aff10c17
date added to LUP
2017-06-30 17:23:49
date last changed
2020-01-12 23:51:26
@inproceedings{f8792bce-1d18-4104-b82f-ba90aff10c17,
  abstract     = {The ability to draw other agents’ attention to objects and events is an important skill on the critical path to effective human-robot collaboration. People use the act of pointing to draw other people’s attention to objects and events for a wide range of purposes. While there is significant work that aims to understand people’s pointing behavior, there is little work analyzing how people interpret robot pointing. Since robots have a wide range of physical bodies and cognitive architectures, interpreting pointing will be determined by a specific robot’s morphology and behavior. Humanoids and robots whose heads, torso and arms resemble humans that point may be easier for people to interpret, however if such robots have different perceptual capabilities to people then misinterpretation may occur. In this paper we investigate how ordinary people interpret the pointing behavior of a leading state-of-the-art service robot that has been designed to work closely with people. We tested three hypotheses about how robot pointing is interpreted. The most surprising finding was that the direction and pitch of the robot’s head was important in some conditions.},
  author       = {Gärdenfors, Peter and Williams, Mary-Anne and Abidi, Shaukat and Wang, Xun and Kuipers, Benjamin and Johnston, Benjamin},
  booktitle    = {Social Robotics : 5th International Conference, ICSR 2013, Bristol, UK, October 27-29, 2013, Proceedings},
  editor       = {Herrmann, Guido and Pearson, Martin J. and Lenz, Alexander and Bremner, Paul and Spiers, Adam and Leonards, Ute},
  isbn         = {978-3-319-02675-6},
  issn         = {0302-9743},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {148--159},
  series       = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science },
  title        = {Interpreting Robot Pointing Behavior},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02675-6_15},
  doi          = {10.1007/978-3-319-02675-6_15},
  volume       = {8239},
  year         = {2013},
}