Advanced

Feeding spinach thylakoids to rats modulates the gut microbiota, decreases food intake and affects the insulin response

Montelius, Caroline LU ; Osman, Nadia LU ; Weström, Björn LU ; Ahrné, Siv LU ; Molin, Göran LU ; Albertsson, Per-Åke LU and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte LU (2013) In Journal of Nutritional Science 2.
Abstract

Thylakoid membranes derived from green leaf chloroplasts affect appetite-regulating hormones, suppress food intake, reduce blood lipids and lead to a decreased body weight in animals and human subjects. Thylakoids also decrease the intestinal in vitro uptake of methyl-glucose in the rat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary thylakoids on the gut microbiota composition, mainly the taxa of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, in rats fed either a thylakoid-enriched diet or a control diet for 10 d. At the same time, a glucose-tolerance test in the same rats was also performed. Food intake was significantly decreased in the thylakoid-fed rats compared with the control-fed rats over the 10-d study. An oral glucose... (More)

Thylakoid membranes derived from green leaf chloroplasts affect appetite-regulating hormones, suppress food intake, reduce blood lipids and lead to a decreased body weight in animals and human subjects. Thylakoids also decrease the intestinal in vitro uptake of methyl-glucose in the rat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary thylakoids on the gut microbiota composition, mainly the taxa of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, in rats fed either a thylakoid-enriched diet or a control diet for 10 d. At the same time, a glucose-tolerance test in the same rats was also performed. Food intake was significantly decreased in the thylakoid-fed rats compared with the control-fed rats over the 10-d study. An oral glucose tolerance test after 10 d of thylakoid- or control-food intake resulted in significantly reduced plasma insulin levels in the thylakoid-fed rats compared with the control-fed rats, while no difference was observed for blood glucose levels. Analysis of gut bacteria showed a significant increase of lactobacilli on the ileal mucosa, specifically Lactobacillus reuteri, in the rats fed the thylakoid diet compared with rats fed the control diet, while faecal lactobacilli decreased. No difference in bifidobacteria between the thylakoid and control groups was found. Analyses with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and principal component analysis of faeces demonstrated different microbial populations in the thylakoid- and control-fed animals. These findings indicate that thylakoids modulate the gut microbial composition, which might be important for the regulation of body weight and energy metabolism.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colon, Small intestine, Obesity, Lactobacilli, Quantitative PCR
in
Journal of Nutritional Science
volume
2
pages
9 pages
publisher
Cambridge University Press
ISSN
2048-6790
DOI
10.1017/jns.2012.29
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f03c7e8-7962-4209-bef8-50caf165e523
date added to LUP
2016-04-27 08:43:40
date last changed
2016-09-20 03:11:22
@misc{2f03c7e8-7962-4209-bef8-50caf165e523,
  abstract     = {<p>Thylakoid membranes derived from green leaf chloroplasts affect appetite-regulating hormones, suppress food intake, reduce blood lipids and lead to a decreased body weight in animals and human subjects. Thylakoids also decrease the intestinal in vitro uptake of methyl-glucose in the rat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary thylakoids on the gut microbiota composition, mainly the taxa of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, in rats fed either a thylakoid-enriched diet or a control diet for 10 d. At the same time, a glucose-tolerance test in the same rats was also performed. Food intake was significantly decreased in the thylakoid-fed rats compared with the control-fed rats over the 10-d study. An oral glucose tolerance test after 10 d of thylakoid- or control-food intake resulted in significantly reduced plasma insulin levels in the thylakoid-fed rats compared with the control-fed rats, while no difference was observed for blood glucose levels. Analysis of gut bacteria showed a significant increase of lactobacilli on the ileal mucosa, specifically Lactobacillus reuteri, in the rats fed the thylakoid diet compared with rats fed the control diet, while faecal lactobacilli decreased. No difference in bifidobacteria between the thylakoid and control groups was found. Analyses with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and principal component analysis of faeces demonstrated different microbial populations in the thylakoid- and control-fed animals. These findings indicate that thylakoids modulate the gut microbial composition, which might be important for the regulation of body weight and energy metabolism.</p>},
  author       = {Montelius, Caroline and Osman, Nadia and Weström, Björn and Ahrné, Siv and Molin, Göran and Albertsson, Per-Åke and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte},
  issn         = {2048-6790},
  keyword      = {Colon,Small intestine,Obesity,Lactobacilli,Quantitative PCR},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9b9c7e8)},
  series       = {Journal of Nutritional Science},
  title        = {Feeding spinach thylakoids to rats modulates the gut microbiota, decreases food intake and affects the insulin response},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jns.2012.29},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2013},
}