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Effects of differences in postprandial glycaemia on cognitive functions in healthy middle aged subjects

Nilsson, Anne LU ; Radeborg, Karl LU and Björck, Inger LU (2009) In European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 63(1). p.113-120
Abstract
Objective: To find useful methods for the studies of cognitive function during a postprandial period, and to use these methods to evaluate function after test meals differing in post meal glycaemia.



Subjects/Methods: Forty healthy volunteers aged 49–70 years were studied. A glucose solution (glucose 50 g) was provided through either a bolus or sipping regimen at breakfast to simulate a high-GI or a low-GI breakfast, respectively. Cognitive tests of working memory (WM) were performed at 35, 90, 120 and 150 min after commencing the breakfast, and a test of selective attention (SA) was performed at 170 min.



Results: Subjects with higher glucose tolerance performed better in the cognitive tests... (More)
Objective: To find useful methods for the studies of cognitive function during a postprandial period, and to use these methods to evaluate function after test meals differing in post meal glycaemia.



Subjects/Methods: Forty healthy volunteers aged 49–70 years were studied. A glucose solution (glucose 50 g) was provided through either a bolus or sipping regimen at breakfast to simulate a high-GI or a low-GI breakfast, respectively. Cognitive tests of working memory (WM) were performed at 35, 90, 120 and 150 min after commencing the breakfast, and a test of selective attention (SA) was performed at 170 min.



Results: Subjects with higher glucose tolerance performed better in the cognitive tests (P<0.05). After entering glucose tolerance as covariate, the subjects performed better in the working memory test at 90 min (P<0.034) and in the selective attention test at 170 min (P<0.017) after the simulated low-glycaemic index (GI) breakfast compared with the simulated high-GI breakfast.



Conclusion: Possibly, the cognitive functions tested were enhanced by avoiding a sharp decline in blood glucose concentration and by maintaining a higher glycaemia in the late postprandial period, respectively. A low-GI diet is preferable in the prevention of the risk of cognitive decline as a result of less efficient glucose regulation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
glucose response, breakfast, cognitive performance, selective attention, glucose tolerance, working memory
in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
63
issue
1
pages
113 - 120
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000262293700015
  • scopus:58149458855
ISSN
1476-5640
DOI
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602900
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
274ddaf0-b31d-425c-9629-64e40e55a2b5 (old id 750513)
date added to LUP
2007-12-21 12:08:05
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:08:37
@article{274ddaf0-b31d-425c-9629-64e40e55a2b5,
  abstract     = {Objective: To find useful methods for the studies of cognitive function during a postprandial period, and to use these methods to evaluate function after test meals differing in post meal glycaemia.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Subjects/Methods: Forty healthy volunteers aged 49–70 years were studied. A glucose solution (glucose 50 g) was provided through either a bolus or sipping regimen at breakfast to simulate a high-GI or a low-GI breakfast, respectively. Cognitive tests of working memory (WM) were performed at 35, 90, 120 and 150 min after commencing the breakfast, and a test of selective attention (SA) was performed at 170 min.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Subjects with higher glucose tolerance performed better in the cognitive tests (P&lt;0.05). After entering glucose tolerance as covariate, the subjects performed better in the working memory test at 90 min (P&lt;0.034) and in the selective attention test at 170 min (P&lt;0.017) after the simulated low-glycaemic index (GI) breakfast compared with the simulated high-GI breakfast.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: Possibly, the cognitive functions tested were enhanced by avoiding a sharp decline in blood glucose concentration and by maintaining a higher glycaemia in the late postprandial period, respectively. A low-GI diet is preferable in the prevention of the risk of cognitive decline as a result of less efficient glucose regulation.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Anne and Radeborg, Karl and Björck, Inger},
  issn         = {1476-5640},
  keyword      = {glucose response,breakfast,cognitive performance,selective attention,glucose tolerance,working memory},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {113--120},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Effects of differences in postprandial glycaemia on cognitive functions in healthy middle aged subjects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602900},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2009},
}