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Perseverance Is crucial for learning. “OK! but Can I take a break?”

Silvervarg, Annika; Haake, Magnus LU and Gulz, Agneta LU (2018) 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, AIED 2018 In Artificial Intelligence in Education - 19th International Conference, AIED 2018, Proceedings 10947 LNAI. p.532-544
Abstract

In a study with 108 10- to 12-year-olds who used a digital educational game targeting history, we addressed the phenomenon of perseverance, that is, the tendency to stick with a task even when it is challenging. The educational game was designed to make all students encounter tasks they did not succeed to solve, at which point they were offered a set of choices corresponding to perseverance and non-perseverance. Methods used were behavioral log data, post-questionnaires, and an in-game questionnaire conducted by a game character, who asked the students about the reason for their choice. Overall, we found no differences between high and low-perseverance students as to their experiences of effort, difficulty, and learning, and neither in... (More)

In a study with 108 10- to 12-year-olds who used a digital educational game targeting history, we addressed the phenomenon of perseverance, that is, the tendency to stick with a task even when it is challenging. The educational game was designed to make all students encounter tasks they did not succeed to solve, at which point they were offered a set of choices corresponding to perseverance and non-perseverance. Methods used were behavioral log data, post-questionnaires, and an in-game questionnaire conducted by a game character, who asked the students about the reason for their choice. Overall, we found no differences between high and low-perseverance students as to their experiences of effort, difficulty, and learning, and neither in their self-reported motives for persevering – when doing so. With respect to performance, however, high-persevering students solved significantly more tasks at higher difficulty levels. Comparing high-perseverance students who tended to take a break directly after a failed test – before they continued with the same task – with those who did not take a break, we found no significant differences, indicating that taking a break is not detrimental to learning and perseverance.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Challenge, Educational software, Meaning-making, Pausing, Performance, Perseverance, Teachable agent
in
Artificial Intelligence in Education - 19th International Conference, AIED 2018, Proceedings
volume
10947 LNAI
pages
13 pages
publisher
Springer Verlag
conference name
19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, AIED 2018
conference location
London, United Kingdom
conference dates
2018-06-27 - 2018-06-30
external identifiers
  • scopus:85049373730
ISSN
1611-3349
0302-9743
ISBN
9783319938424
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-93843-1_39
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89d1f8c4-ac84-4d95-b168-d882cee9feb0
date added to LUP
2018-07-17 12:30:03
date last changed
2018-07-17 12:30:03
@inproceedings{89d1f8c4-ac84-4d95-b168-d882cee9feb0,
  abstract     = {<p>In a study with 108 10- to 12-year-olds who used a digital educational game targeting history, we addressed the phenomenon of perseverance, that is, the tendency to stick with a task even when it is challenging. The educational game was designed to make all students encounter tasks they did not succeed to solve, at which point they were offered a set of choices corresponding to perseverance and non-perseverance. Methods used were behavioral log data, post-questionnaires, and an in-game questionnaire conducted by a game character, who asked the students about the reason for their choice. Overall, we found no differences between high and low-perseverance students as to their experiences of effort, difficulty, and learning, and neither in their self-reported motives for persevering – when doing so. With respect to performance, however, high-persevering students solved significantly more tasks at higher difficulty levels. Comparing high-perseverance students who tended to take a break directly after a failed test – before they continued with the same task – with those who did not take a break, we found no significant differences, indicating that taking a break is not detrimental to learning and perseverance.</p>},
  author       = {Silvervarg, Annika and Haake, Magnus and Gulz, Agneta},
  booktitle    = {Artificial Intelligence in Education - 19th International Conference, AIED 2018, Proceedings},
  isbn         = {9783319938424},
  issn         = {1611-3349},
  keyword      = {Challenge,Educational software,Meaning-making,Pausing,Performance,Perseverance,Teachable agent},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {London, United Kingdom},
  month        = {01},
  pages        = {532--544},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  title        = {Perseverance Is crucial for learning. “OK! but Can I take a break?”},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93843-1_39},
  volume       = {10947 LNAI},
  year         = {2018},
}