Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Reciprocity and challenge in researcher-student collaborative labour in a multilingual secondary school

Källkvist, Marie LU orcid ; Gyllstad, Henrik LU ; Sandlund, Erica and Sundqvist, Pia (2023) p.59-70
Abstract

This chapter focuses on challenge and reciprocity in researcher-student collaborative labour (Zigo 2001) in a large multilingual secondary school in Sweden. The school was recruited for a larger longitudinal study of classroom language policy. For the purposes of the present chapter, we analysed ethnographic data to shed light on the well-known challenge of recruiting and retaining students to participate in longitudinal research, and on aspects of reciprocity, which was opera-tionalized as benefits that both parties, i.e. students and researchers, needed or desired (Trainor and Bouchard 2013). Results show that of the 43 students who were present in the classrooms studied, 35 (81%) provided written, informed consent to fill in a... (More)

This chapter focuses on challenge and reciprocity in researcher-student collaborative labour (Zigo 2001) in a large multilingual secondary school in Sweden. The school was recruited for a larger longitudinal study of classroom language policy. For the purposes of the present chapter, we analysed ethnographic data to shed light on the well-known challenge of recruiting and retaining students to participate in longitudinal research, and on aspects of reciprocity, which was opera-tionalized as benefits that both parties, i.e. students and researchers, needed or desired (Trainor and Bouchard 2013). Results show that of the 43 students who were present in the classrooms studied, 35 (81%) provided written, informed consent to fill in a language-background questionnaire and participate in an interview. Fewer students with low grades consented to participate, but those who did provided data no less rich than that provided by students with top grades. As to reciprocal benefits, the researchers secured the research data needed, but also new knowledge about students' heritage languages and the multilingual territories they had left prior to settling in Sweden. Another benefit relates to empowerment. The researchers were empowered by learning culturally appropriate terminology to use when communicating about multilingual and multi-ethnic territories; and interview data suggest that students were empowered when positioned as experts on their multilingual repertoires and the language ecology in their prior home territories. Finally, the chapter reveals that researchers' stance of reciprocity evolved organically over time through their ethnographic engagement in the classrooms.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Collaborative Research in Language Education : Reciprocal Benefits and Challenges - Reciprocal Benefits and Challenges
pages
12 pages
publisher
Mouton de Gruyter
external identifiers
  • scopus:85166039342
ISBN
9783110787719
9783110787535
DOI
10.1515/9783110787719-005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cd1b4a23-f2a8-466a-9664-0bf7cb5c00bd
date added to LUP
2023-11-02 11:08:18
date last changed
2024-02-18 21:54:19
@inbook{cd1b4a23-f2a8-466a-9664-0bf7cb5c00bd,
  abstract     = {{<p>This chapter focuses on challenge and reciprocity in researcher-student collaborative labour (Zigo 2001) in a large multilingual secondary school in Sweden. The school was recruited for a larger longitudinal study of classroom language policy. For the purposes of the present chapter, we analysed ethnographic data to shed light on the well-known challenge of recruiting and retaining students to participate in longitudinal research, and on aspects of reciprocity, which was opera-tionalized as benefits that both parties, i.e. students and researchers, needed or desired (Trainor and Bouchard 2013). Results show that of the 43 students who were present in the classrooms studied, 35 (81%) provided written, informed consent to fill in a language-background questionnaire and participate in an interview. Fewer students with low grades consented to participate, but those who did provided data no less rich than that provided by students with top grades. As to reciprocal benefits, the researchers secured the research data needed, but also new knowledge about students' heritage languages and the multilingual territories they had left prior to settling in Sweden. Another benefit relates to empowerment. The researchers were empowered by learning culturally appropriate terminology to use when communicating about multilingual and multi-ethnic territories; and interview data suggest that students were empowered when positioned as experts on their multilingual repertoires and the language ecology in their prior home territories. Finally, the chapter reveals that researchers' stance of reciprocity evolved organically over time through their ethnographic engagement in the classrooms.</p>}},
  author       = {{Källkvist, Marie and Gyllstad, Henrik and Sandlund, Erica and Sundqvist, Pia}},
  booktitle    = {{Collaborative Research in Language Education : Reciprocal Benefits and Challenges}},
  isbn         = {{9783110787719}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{59--70}},
  publisher    = {{Mouton de Gruyter}},
  title        = {{Reciprocity and challenge in researcher-student collaborative labour in a multilingual secondary school}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/9783110787719-005}},
  doi          = {{10.1515/9783110787719-005}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}