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Low glycaemic-index foods

Björck, Inger LU ; Elmståhl, Helena LU and Östman, Elin LU (2000) Diet and the Metabolic syndrome In British Journal of Nutrition 83(suppl 1). p.149-155
Abstract
Accumulating data indicate that a diet characterized by low glycaemic-index (GI) foods not only improves certain metabolic ramifications of insulin resistance, but also reduces insulin resistance per se. Epidemiological data also suggest a protective role against development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. A major disadvantage in this connection is the shortage of low-GI foods, and many common starchy staple foods, such as bread products, breakfast cereals and potato products, have a high GI. Studies in our laboratory show that it is possible to significantly lower the GI of starchy foods, for example by choice of raw material and/or by optimizing the processing conditions. Such low-GI foods may or... (More)
Accumulating data indicate that a diet characterized by low glycaemic-index (GI) foods not only improves certain metabolic ramifications of insulin resistance, but also reduces insulin resistance per se. Epidemiological data also suggest a protective role against development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. A major disadvantage in this connection is the shortage of low-GI foods, and many common starchy staple foods, such as bread products, breakfast cereals and potato products, have a high GI. Studies in our laboratory show that it is possible to significantly lower the GI of starchy foods, for example by choice of raw material and/or by optimizing the processing conditions. Such low-GI foods may or may not influence glucose tolerance at a subsequent meal. Consequently, certain low-GI breakfasts capable of maintaining a net increment in blood glucose and insulin at the time of the next meal significantly reduced post-prandial glycaemia and insulinaemia following a standardized lunch meal, whereas others had no ‘second-meal’ impact. These results imply that certain low-GI foods may be more efficient in modulating metabolism in the long term. Although the literature supports a linear correlation between the GI and insulinaemic index (II) of foods, this is not always the case. Consequently, milk products elicited elevated IIs, indistinguishable from a white bread reference meal, despite GIs in the lower range. This inconsistent behaviour of milk products has not been acknowledged, and potential metabolic consequences remain to be elucidated. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Starch, Carbohydrates, Second-meal effect, Dietary fibre, Resistant starch, Metabolic syndrome, Insulinaemic index, Glycaemic index
in
British Journal of Nutrition
volume
83
issue
suppl 1
pages
149 - 155
publisher
CABI Publishing
conference name
Diet and the Metabolic syndrome
external identifiers
  • scopus:0342313535
ISSN
1475-2662
0007-1145
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f604463-ff8c-4adc-ab03-bb7096eca0bc (old id 830321)
date added to LUP
2008-01-07 09:10:11
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:48:50
@inproceedings{0f604463-ff8c-4adc-ab03-bb7096eca0bc,
  abstract     = {Accumulating data indicate that a diet characterized by low glycaemic-index (GI) foods not only improves certain metabolic ramifications of insulin resistance, but also reduces insulin resistance per se. Epidemiological data also suggest a protective role against development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. A major disadvantage in this connection is the shortage of low-GI foods, and many common starchy staple foods, such as bread products, breakfast cereals and potato products, have a high GI. Studies in our laboratory show that it is possible to significantly lower the GI of starchy foods, for example by choice of raw material and/or by optimizing the processing conditions. Such low-GI foods may or may not influence glucose tolerance at a subsequent meal. Consequently, certain low-GI breakfasts capable of maintaining a net increment in blood glucose and insulin at the time of the next meal significantly reduced post-prandial glycaemia and insulinaemia following a standardized lunch meal, whereas others had no ‘second-meal’ impact. These results imply that certain low-GI foods may be more efficient in modulating metabolism in the long term. Although the literature supports a linear correlation between the GI and insulinaemic index (II) of foods, this is not always the case. Consequently, milk products elicited elevated IIs, indistinguishable from a white bread reference meal, despite GIs in the lower range. This inconsistent behaviour of milk products has not been acknowledged, and potential metabolic consequences remain to be elucidated.},
  author       = {Björck, Inger and Elmståhl, Helena and Östman, Elin},
  booktitle    = {British Journal of Nutrition},
  issn         = {1475-2662},
  keyword      = {Starch,Carbohydrates,Second-meal effect,Dietary fibre,Resistant starch,Metabolic syndrome,Insulinaemic index,Glycaemic index},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {suppl 1},
  pages        = {149--155},
  publisher    = {CABI Publishing},
  title        = {Low glycaemic-index foods},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2000},
}